Wingflame

Gathering all Unity users! and everyone else who's interested.

19 posts in this topic

Hey everyone!! Wingy here :3

 

Since this area has been super quiet for a while now, i was wondering who all here use Unity, Even if it is the occasional dabbling around with it ^^. 

 

i myself am a main unity user currently. So it would be super excited to meet some people who use/are interested in unity to teach and learn from. Feel free to drop by and lemme know :3 

 

 

PhoenixSoul likes this

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I used Unity 4 a bit, but don't actively develop it in at the moment. It'd be curious to see what you've been working on though, you've talking about some projects for some time...

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Ohh thats been quite a while x3 , alot of stuff got changed. My projects? its been mostly prototype projects for me (for assignments and such), since i haven't really gotten a chance to work on a personal project so far. 

 

Currently im working on a multiplayer moba style project for my final year project. Its been a huge mess xD but also good learning since now i have the hang of networking and multiplayer :3. Maybe once i start working on a personal project i can show you guys ^^

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I tried it before, never got very far with it. It always seemed to be in this weird zone between 'too advanced to be intuitively easy to use' and 'not advanced enough to be real programing' for me. I think I rather either play around with making maps/mods for existing games where I have some more bases to work with or learn enough programing to make an engine myself. I mean with RPG Maker it's basically the equivalent of making a mod. The whole game is already there, even if none of the content or details are. Unity isn't really like that. But it doesn't strike me as the same as being able to open up the engine's code and edit it as you like and recompile it either. I know you can do a hack of a lot with Unity's scripting, but I am not sure how far that freedom goes.

 

So, I am interested in Unity but I am not sure if it's something I would want to use in a 'real' project or not, ya know?

Edited by KilloZapit

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I actually tried to get into it even before RPG Maker. Basically I saw some smaller FPS horrors and other slender clones and I wanted to try it myself. However, at that time I was a complete 'noob' and all I did was to watch some tutorials, to see what that thing was about. After realizing, that it's way more complicated than I originally thought, I abandoned the idea.

 

After some time, I got fascinated with other things and that's how I started using RM. I still was a 'noob', but RM was much easier to start with and that's how my game-dev story started. I didn't give Unity another try yet, but I like its possibilities, so perhaps in the future... Now I'd be oriented there better after all. ^^

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@KilloZapit it's all about giving it time , the first time i opened it i was the in the same scenario of getting overwhelmed by how complicated it is, but it really isnt. its fairly easy to use and interms of coding probably easier than rpgmaker. the codes u script in ruby and javascript are probably more lower level compared to unity where ur scripting than coding in C#. As far as limitations goes , i havent found the engine to be limiting at all. All unity does is provide you with all the common components that you may need for your game , things like Physics and Collision Detection , Audio , UI elements so you dont waste time making/coding them ( which btw you can if you really wanted to) So as far as freedom goes you can literally do whatever you want :3.

 

@Rikifive Same here , unity's learning curve is a bit steep ( Unreal even steeper) in the beginning but once u get past that , then its really simple to do anything you like. What i think is the most amazing thing in unity is their documentation and tutorials and stuff. ill admit they still have to fix their multiplayer stuff , but their single player side of things are pretty solid. 

 

You guys could always take a look here - https://madewith.unity.com/  it always inspires me cause there are so many amazing games and ud be surprised as to how many popular games are made with unity x3

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@KilloZapit it's all about giving it time , the first time i opened it i was the in the same scenario of getting overwhelmed by how complicated it is, but it really isnt. its fairly easy to use and interms of coding probably easier than rpgmaker. the codes u script in ruby and javascript are probably more lower level compared to unity where ur scripting than coding in C#. As far as limitations goes , i havent found the engine to be limiting at all. All unity does is provide you with all the common components that you may need for your game , things like Physics and Collision Detection , Audio , UI elements so you dont waste time making/coding them ( which btw you can if you really wanted to) So as far as freedom goes you can literally do whatever you want :3

 

It's not even really that it's complicated, it's more that it's empty. With RPG Maker all the major stuff to make a basic RPG is done already. Unity doesn't have that sort of pre-built template to customize. Experimenting and playing around with RPG Maker is easy to do, not so much with Unity. Yes there is an asset store, but quite frankly it seems like a rip-off for me. I am not willing to invest money in my playing around. Also is Ruby really any higher/lower level then C#?

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@KilloZapit yea but that is what makes rpgmaker more restricted. if you were to make anything else in rpgmaker u would have to do so much effort into getting around the rigid base rpgmaker has and well some games wouldn't even be possible. This is why unity is considered to be one of the most popular engine, because it provides you with all the tools you need for any kind of games , whether 2d or 3d , singleplayer/multiplayer or any genre. Rpgmaker is only good at one thing which is top down rpg games but what bothers me is that 95% of the games made with rpgmaker look/feel the same, you can easily spot a game that is made in rpgmaker.  As far as assets go , when you're learning theres plenty of free assets available for you to dabble with. 

 

Hm im not really sure , i personally consider Ruby closer to c++ than c# but i could be wrong since i dont know how to code in ruby.

 

@lonequeso hmm i've never heard of a unity spell in any game xD or maybe i forgot. The only thing that pops in my head is AC- Unity xD

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@KilloZapit yea but that is what makes rpgmaker more restricted. if you were to make anything else in rpgmaker u would have to do so much effort into getting around the rigid base rpgmaker has and well some games wouldn't even be possible. This is why unity is considered to be one of the most popular engine, because it provides you with all the tools you need for any kind of games , whether 2d or 3d , singleplayer/multiplayer or any genre. Rpgmaker is only good at one thing which is top down rpg games but what bothers me is that 95% of the games made with rpgmaker look/feel the same, you can easily spot a game that is made in rpgmaker.  As far as assets go , when you're learning theres plenty of free assets available for you to dabble with. 

 

Hm im not really sure , i personally consider Ruby closer to c++ than c# but i could be wrong since i dont know how to code in ruby.

 

Like I said, Unity seems in a weird area between what RPG Maker does and 'real programing' for me. But I may just need to get used to it.

 

Also: Ruby and C# I think are about the same level, C# may be even lower level then Ruby, but I am not sure. I mean Ruby has a built in garbage collection and no pointer math or memory allocation, but I think C# does that too? Maybe not...

 

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both of them have all of those things, so its more or less the same. I guess it could be higher. i wouldn't know i barely have knowledge about ruby. 

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I used to play around a bit with unity, but since I changed to a Xenial distro I've been unable to use it w/o major bugs. The mir fix is scheduled for sometime this fall... I think :unsure: I'll get back to it eventually.

 

As for the C# vs Ruby question. C# is closer to the machine but not by much (a few libs can bring em to par), the big difference is actually that C# is a compiled language and Ruby is interpreted.

 

This matters since there are some strengths and weaknesses associated with the two.

 

Interpreted

  • Needs no installation (you just install the interpreter) after that you can just Ctrl C+V the exe and run it as is.
  • Easier to integrate with other languages. (Completely void since RPGM doesn't allow for extensions to the source)

Compiled

  • Longer install time since all your code has to be reduced to machine-code. This comes with the benefit of not needing an interpreter and removes a lot of the overhead. Game runs faster, like a lot faster. Well written code can run upto 20 times as fast (in certain circumstances) but usually averages out at about 3-5 times as fast.
  • Harder to integrate with other languages, commonly memory access/function call errors that are hard to track down happens when you change code in any file outside main.

Hope it sheds some light on the situation. ;)

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Uh.... C# doesn't usually compile to machine code I am pretty sure. I think it can, but I was always under the impression it was more like Java's bytecode and virtual machine. It still needs you to install either .Net Framework or Mono. JRuby works basically the same way on Java's virtual machine actually. Then there is the whole JIT compilation thing... Still that's mostly implementation details, it's still basically true that Ruby is designed to be fully interpretive and C# isn't. More important I think is the type system. Ruby plays fast and loose with types to the point where the whole idea of a 'type' is basically nonexistent, which makes things a lot less of a pain to code but can be a bit of a pain to debug if you aren't careful.

Edited by KilloZapit

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Woopsy i haven't responded in this thread in a long while XD, hm interesting stuff. ive never really done any extensive research on how compilers work for different languages. i tend to steer away cause thats like the intensive stuff. 

Anyways since ive been practicing unity these days , ill see if i can post some stuff here , maybe get more people interested :D. The last project i did was making a tetris game for the mobile/pc . it was a pretty helpful course that did help me learn a few new things :3. Here's a screenie for it

Spoiler

cg7XryI.png

 

PhoenixSoul likes this

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One of the projects I'm currently involved with is also being developed in Unity.

 

I've mentioned this before, but this has come a really long way from GuitaRPG...

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~That was as of Alpha v.10, the following is the latest version...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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ooh that is pretty cool :3, yea i love the fact the engine is so robust and flexible, i think the best part that i like is their documentation , its so organized with examples , helps out so much :3 

 

Did you guys end up making an audio system that generates the beats to press depending on the song or is the beats of the song manually made? ive never really worked in this kinda game but im sure doing the former isn't easy xD.

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@Wingflame The current audio plugin is Bass.net.

I'm actually a tester, and a charter. I've no direct involvement with programming, but I can tell you this. The 'beats' (notes actually) are all graphics, and the charts which the notes appear on are actually made with specific software. In the cases of both Holy Diver and Tribute, these are both Rock Band charts (and rips from the game data itself), but as far as what Harmonix uses to chart their songs, not sure on that.

 

But there is software out there for the end user to create their own charts. Feedback (or dB as it is often referred as) is one of the earliest, but is well outdated. Then there's MoonScraper, which works a lot like dB (though the intricacies of MS are unknown to me because I cannot use it - pink screen issues), but is limited to the same chart parts as dB is.

 

There's a rather resource-heavy software called EOF (Editor On Fire), which was designed to replace the in-game editor for Frets on Fire, a free GH clone that is well outdated. EOF is the one I use, and it does a lot. It creates and modifies chart parts for many parts, such as Part Guitar, Part Bass, Part Drums (which includes notation for Rock Band 3 Pro Drums as well as notation for Guitar Hero's Expert + difficulty), Part Guitar-Co-Op (for the early GH games that had only two-player Co-Op), Part Rhythm (Rhythm Guitar!), Part Vocals (but not Harmonies-yet if ever), Part Keys (as seen in Rock Band 3) but not Pro Keys (to program those and Harmonies you would need a Midi Editor like REAPER), Pro Guitar/Bass (also seen in Rock Band 3), Real Guitar/Bass (for the RockSmith games), and then there's Real Drums, which was a thing for a game called Phase Shift, a clone of Rock Band 3. Real Drums is basically the same as Pro Drums, but there's notations for hi-hat cymbals, and rimshots as well. EOF also can import and modify/create from scratch, Dance Dance Revolution type charts, this is called Part Dance. Phase Shift could play these too.

 

More recently, EOF has been given Guitar Hero: LIVE support, in that one can create those types of charts, but they're not separate Parts. You would go into Part Guitar, or Part Bass or any one of the Parts that can be played with a Guitar controller, and in one of the menus, tick Enable GHL Mode, and then one would be able to create/modify the GHL charts. Right now, there is no platform that supports GHL charts, but Clone Hero will in the nearer future.

 

Yup, all done in Unity. Well, the audio is not Unity's default, but for what we need, Unity's audio engine is inferior.

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ooh i see , sounds pretty cool , im pretty unfamiliar with those things since i never really focused on that genre of games. Integrating something from outside , ive only done that once so far for a multiplayer game O:

 

You're a tester huh , that sounds awesome ^^ , everyone starts out from there i think x3. you do game dev in rpgmaker though yea ? 

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@Wingflame Yes, RM is part of my gamedev repertoire...

 

If I had a more powerful computer, I'd help more on the development side of the CH project.

 

I believe Alpha v.15 will be out soon...

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