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  1. Today
  2. PhoenixSoul

    What're Ya Buyin?

    Same here, @Arrpeegeemaker...
  3. Yesterday
  4. KayakoChan

    Hearts Like Clockwork (Now with teaser 'trailer')

    To breathe a little life into this thread I present the teaser trailer~! Also an itch.io page for the upcoming demo! https://kayakoamaya.itch.io/hearts-like-clockwork
  5. To all you people on here who've been saying I'm really a squirrel bestowed with the gift of human intellect inside of a remarkably attractive man-robot, operating him with controls, that is false, it's fake news, it's violent and it hurts my feelings. I'm a kitty cat bestowed with the gift of human intellect inside of a remarkably attractive man-robot, operating him with controls.

  6. Arrpeegeemaker

    Too much info

    I like backstory, but I prefer to have to go the extra mile to get all of it, in most games. I'm ok with a game's presented story only being 20-30% of the material. Like other users here have said, it helps the bit you're presented with feel more real. There's a balance, of course, between talking about things like they exist, and attempting to 'naturally' present players with info. The former can be confusing, an make you think you've missed something. The latter can come off as super contrived, especially in dialogue. As far as the stuff OP mentioned, with histories, diseases, etc, I would only think that was overkill if I had no way of avoiding it all just to play the main game. Like I said, I personally like to go looking for more story details, when I'm ready and if I feel like it.
  7. Kayzee

    Too much info

    Though if you are a player who wants to play and not read for a half a damn hour, I am not sure if the kind of games most people make with RPG Maker are always all that appealing. :P I for one don't really have a problem with reading a lot of text. I sometimes even like visual novels, which are basically all text and pictures! But yeah, how the text is presented matters. The problem with Simon's Quest was the ridiculously slow text speed, not that it threw an unending stream of text your way. There is also the common problem of not having a chance to save after a big dramatic cutscene before you face a boss and so have to watch the same scene again and again. Also it really doesn't help that the text box can only really hold a few lines of text at a time, so when you have streams and streams of it and no real good way of breaking it up it can be pretty tedious. In the game I am working on I have a looooot of dialogue that explains this or that. Most of it is completely optional though and is only given to the player if they actually ask for info about something. It helped that I scripted something I could use to make adventure game style dialogue trees with topics you can ask about which can unlock more topics to ask about. I try to write most of it in a more natural casual way, as if I am actually talking to someone, with appropriate pauses and breaks to try not to just pile text on the player without giving them the space to take any of it in. Putting \. in a few places and breaking text across multiple message box commands can really help with flow if you do it right! In short, I try to write the text as if I am actually holding a conversation with the player. And, well, since the main NPC you talk to in the game is, in fact, me, I kinda am. :P
  8. Arrpeegeemaker

    What're Ya Buyin?

    @Lord Vectramine is awful. Mine is just sad XD
  9. FluffexStudios

    Stitched

    Hi everyone, As Lunar New Year heads closer to us, we have a few quality of life changes for the game. - Addressed several instances of slow key inputs for escape sequences. - Updated a few area within the basement to add more consistency. - Fixed a sprite issue with a sprite early in the game. - Added a few missing dialogues. Once again, thanks everyone for providing feedback for Stitched! Cheers! Fluffex Studios
  10. PhoenixSoul

    Too much info

    I think that if the information has relevance, it should remain as is, but if not, then it should be trivial stuffs to peruse at the player's leisure... Of course, I'm basically seconding what everyone else has said, but I also want to point out a flaw with Proper Noun Syndrome in that sometimes, even if the lore is important, it can be absolutely bland to the player who wants to play and not read for half a damn hour. There isn't a name for this specifically, but there's a good example of this that I'll reference here, Simon's Quest Syndrome. "OH WHAT A TERRIBLE NIGHT TO HAVE A CURSE." Yeah, that, if you get the reference.
  11. Kayzee

    Too much info

    It's really not the amount of info that's the real problem, it's how it's presented to the player. It's too easy to fall into what I call Proper Noun Syndrome, where the player is just constantly peppered with bad exposition about things they don't care about. Like when you have those big open text crawls that go something like "On the world of Zig, between the Mushi and Holorin empires, lay the small kingdom of Gerglebutt, where King Snifflepinkle rules with a kind just hand, blah blah blah blah..." That's classic Proper Noun Syndrome. When something has no real context or build up, and instead it's just like "OPEN UP, I AM ABOUT TO FEED YOU A BIG 'O HELPING OF PROPER NOUNS AND EXPOSITION, AND YOU BETTER SWALLOW EVERY DROP YOU DISGUSTING LOREPIG!!!! SQUEAL FOR ME!!!" Now don't get me wrong, I love me a big helping of juicy exposition\lore sometimes... if it's actually written well and interesting. I mean I like Homestuck for goodness sake. Homestuck has pages and pages and pages of silly proper nouns and exposition... Though it helps that Homestuck is well aware how ridiculous it can be and is partly a huge parody of that type of thing... And yet still better at it then 99% of fiction. I seriously think a lot about proper worldbuilding can be learned thanks to Homestuck. It probobly helps that most of the exposition is explained by actual characters, talking in a natural and flowing way and it mostly introduces concepts and shows just enough to keep the reader interested before it actually fully explains anything.
  12. That One NPC

    Too much info

    Detail is great. Depends on the gamer type, but there's a large niche for highly detailed rpgs. I love them. Just be sure things are balanced.
  13. Rikifive

    Too much info

    Moved to Theory and Development; Games in Progress is for submitting your projects, that are in progress. Threads in Games in Progress are expected to meet these requirements: https://www.rpgmakercentral.com/announcement/20-submitting-your-games/ It ultimately depends on the execution. If enough care and polishing is put and if these all play their part in an interesting and relevant way, then it may create an intriguing world worth exploring. However, if it will end up being mostly walls of text, that go too much into details, while not being really important to the story and whatsoever, then most of the players will simply want to skip all of this. If you want to put tons of trivial information, it's best to do so in form of books, that players will be able to read if they'd be interested - or something similar. It won't hurt having too much information if you'll keep that optional. ... I tried to read all the books in Skyrim, gave up after few, when I found a some kind of library with tons of these. ... but it's nice to have stuff explained, some people dig into such trivia. Also there's a common mistake people do in their rpg maker games, but I guess it's the easiest way to get it done - putting books etc. with a long chain of text in message boxes. Reading in the cheapest way, without knowing how long it actually is tends to grow players impatient after a while. This sometimes also comes with a frustrating result - accidentally triggering the whole chain of text again after trying to skip. This is a bad, bad design, that often annoys players. I highly recommend making reading more pleasant than that.
  14. Last week
  15. Lord Vectra

    Too much info

    If the info is given piece by piece or can be read somewhere by a player to be able to take a break and revisit later (i.e. a book they can read anytime in their inventory) then there is never enough information because every piece should make your world feel more alive.
  16. Lord Vectra

    What're Ya Buyin?

    I plan to buy a new compuer. Mine is 5 years old, but funny enough, its more powerful than some new PCs lol
  17. Doomboxx1134

    Too much info

    I feel like I have too much information going into this game, like, for example, I have plant types, diseases, drugs, sicknesses, deities..etc I even went as far as writing kingdom histories, different factions, religions even the creation and evolution of man and half breeds, magic etc.. is this too much?
  18. Yay! *sprinkles fairy dust around*
  19. Kayzee

    Undefined method error in script

    Uh... Looks to me like that code was made for an event call or something and you just stuck it in a class without understanding how classes work. You aren't actually defining a method, so your code just gets run once when the program starts up. I mean, when else would it run? But $game_variables isn't set yet. In general whenever you see an undefined method error about nil:NilClass it means you are trying to do something with something that isn't actually there. Even if it was, when starting or loading a game $game_variables gets reset anyway. What are you trying to do with this? I mean, when is this code going to actually be used? If you want to use it as part of an event call, you should define it as a method in the Game_Interpreter class like this: class Game_Interpreter def Calc_Hit_Chance <insert your code here> end end Or heck, just not using a class at all will work: def Calc_Hit_Chance <insert your code here> end Generally very few programmers program that way anymore, but hey, it works and is pretty simple! If you are just starting out, maybe ditching classes if all you use is event script calls is the right move. Though you have to be careful what you name your methods if you don't use a class or module, since if you name a method something that is already used it will be overwritten and that can cause issues. Half the reason programmers don't tend to do it that way anymore is because it can get annoying in large programs when you have to name every function something completely different. Of course in any case the code won't do anything unless you actually call it somewhere, but I assume you are using events to do that right?
  20. TaranAlvein

    Undefined method error in script

    I'm getting the error "Undefined method '[]=' for nil:NilClass. I've looked up advice online, but it's utterly useless, since the problem itself should be impossible. All I'm doing is using a script to adjust the value of a variable. Please take a look at my code and let me know if there is anything that would cause a problem. This snippet of code represents the sum total of all scripts that interact with the game's variables in any way. The other two scripts are entirely self-contained, and at any rate, they've been commented out to rule them out as suspects.
  21. TaranAlvein

    My game doesn't WORK!!! (D:)

    Does it give you an error, or does something simply not work as intended? What you've posted here appears to be the default method definition for "display_name", so it seems likely that you've edited how the game displays location names in some way. Is this the case? If there's an error message, could you please post a screenshot of it?
  22. Guest

    Noyemi K's General Indoor/Modern Tiles (+ additions)

    This is absolutely gorgeous, I completely adore this tileset! I hope you make more like this!
  23. Yeah, it works as intended. Merci beaucoup.
  24. Actually, no... I think the weapons array only returns weapons, so 0 will be the first weapon no matter where it's slot is. But you may have to try it and see!
  25. So, those are slot values? Weapons are slots 1 and 2 since Skill Card is slot 0 (or that's how they're arranged).
  26. No silly, why did you change the numbers? Did you think they were the index of the party member or something? $game_party.leader.weapons[1] && ($game_party.leader.weapons[0] == $game_party.leader.weapons[1]) For the party leader at least.
  27. So... $game_party.leader.weapons && ($game_party.leader.weapons[1] == $game_party.leader.weapons[2])
  28. Yup yup yup! I think you are right anyway...
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