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Tharis

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  1. Like
    Tharis got a reaction from The Dragon God in Will RPGS take the Throne?   
    When I see this question I see where the idea was born from. FPSs were, from 1993 till around 2001 primarily PC based. Which meant more limited sales and fewer people playing them. RPGs on the other hand during the same timeframe (and before) were generally console based and thus more accessible to a wider audience than the PC crowd.
     
    The gaming industry was satisfied to continue this trend, and then the Xbox was released. This is where things actually took the turn which changed the gaming industry into what we know it as today. Halo specifically was the turning point, accessibility had suddenly now been bridged for console gamers at large for their FPSs. Given that most JRPG companies (since JRPGs were the most prolific console subgenre) had not changed up their games in nearly 2 decades the want and need for these titles waned, heavily. Larger development costs longer development cycles and the ever growing desire to have things look more and more realistic lent itself much better to the FPS where gameplay lasts a matter of, at best, a few dozen minutes until the players are reset and things begin anew. This is juxtaposed by the RPG (typically the story based dramatic tale of a world saving band of heros) where the action is not reset but dragged onward through more and newer places all of which need to be somewhat persistent and players expect 20+ hours of gameplay before climax and credits.
     
    But the pendulum swings both ways, as the gains in graphical levels begin to ebb the costs for creating such works of art will also be brought lower, this isn't to say that it will be an overnight event we are probably still looking at a few years (5 -8 in my opinion) before that can become the case. But as we have seen with the newest generation of consoles, although they look better than the previous iterations the improvements are not as drastic and mind blowing as they were from prior cyclical change. My personal feelings on this are that you will begin to see more RPGs make there way back from the land of handhelds and PCs where they had migrated to and the number of blockbuster FPSs begin to diminish. Take for instance the growing underwhelm that the new FPSs are making even within their most beloved fans, and what's more scary for that genre's creators is the fringe fans (general population that regularly disregard gaming as a hobby) aren't as excited with the newest titles, much like the RPG crowd of the PS2 era.
     
    Now I do appreciate what SpookyMothman has alluded to with the idea that these two genres serve different purposes and different audiences, however, this same transition happened at the end of the PS2/Xbox life cycle. This was regardless of the of fact that there was still a hungry audience for RPGs that was left largely dissatisfied with the selection and quality of the work provided during the next console lifespan. This could easily happen in the FPS genre and as far as I see it, the barometer is looking to be about the same, unless costs spike for development again, we will likely see a small resurgence of longer more complicated and story driven games, IE RPGs. 
  2. Like
    Tharis got a reaction from The Dragon God in Will RPGS take the Throne?   
    When I see this question I see where the idea was born from. FPSs were, from 1993 till around 2001 primarily PC based. Which meant more limited sales and fewer people playing them. RPGs on the other hand during the same timeframe (and before) were generally console based and thus more accessible to a wider audience than the PC crowd.
     
    The gaming industry was satisfied to continue this trend, and then the Xbox was released. This is where things actually took the turn which changed the gaming industry into what we know it as today. Halo specifically was the turning point, accessibility had suddenly now been bridged for console gamers at large for their FPSs. Given that most JRPG companies (since JRPGs were the most prolific console subgenre) had not changed up their games in nearly 2 decades the want and need for these titles waned, heavily. Larger development costs longer development cycles and the ever growing desire to have things look more and more realistic lent itself much better to the FPS where gameplay lasts a matter of, at best, a few dozen minutes until the players are reset and things begin anew. This is juxtaposed by the RPG (typically the story based dramatic tale of a world saving band of heros) where the action is not reset but dragged onward through more and newer places all of which need to be somewhat persistent and players expect 20+ hours of gameplay before climax and credits.
     
    But the pendulum swings both ways, as the gains in graphical levels begin to ebb the costs for creating such works of art will also be brought lower, this isn't to say that it will be an overnight event we are probably still looking at a few years (5 -8 in my opinion) before that can become the case. But as we have seen with the newest generation of consoles, although they look better than the previous iterations the improvements are not as drastic and mind blowing as they were from prior cyclical change. My personal feelings on this are that you will begin to see more RPGs make there way back from the land of handhelds and PCs where they had migrated to and the number of blockbuster FPSs begin to diminish. Take for instance the growing underwhelm that the new FPSs are making even within their most beloved fans, and what's more scary for that genre's creators is the fringe fans (general population that regularly disregard gaming as a hobby) aren't as excited with the newest titles, much like the RPG crowd of the PS2 era.
     
    Now I do appreciate what SpookyMothman has alluded to with the idea that these two genres serve different purposes and different audiences, however, this same transition happened at the end of the PS2/Xbox life cycle. This was regardless of the of fact that there was still a hungry audience for RPGs that was left largely dissatisfied with the selection and quality of the work provided during the next console lifespan. This could easily happen in the FPS genre and as far as I see it, the barometer is looking to be about the same, unless costs spike for development again, we will likely see a small resurgence of longer more complicated and story driven games, IE RPGs. 
  3. Like
    Tharis reacted to SpookyMothman in Will RPGS take the Throne?   
    Um... no. Never, actually.
     
    FPSs and RPGs fulfill totally different needs. FPSs are all about finesse and competition. People like the thrill of winning, and honestly, RPGs probably won't ever be able to replicate that feeling. After all, winning against a random number generator is nowhere near as satisfying as winning against an actual human. FPSs also usually have a co-op element to them, which happily invites people like me who love having fun with their bros.
     
    RPGs, however, fill a need for immersion and/or progression. Everybody loses from time to time in FPSs. You can learn to play better, but then, so can your opponents. In RPGs, it's always the same systems, and the same familiar paths you're taking with few differences between playthroughs. The only real difference is the player's skill and understanding of the game's mechanics. RPGs also do things that FPSs can't do anywhere near as well, and that's storytelling and character development. RPGs are much more character and story focused than FPSs, which are almost entirely action focused. Both Western and Eastern style RPGs fill these needs just fine.
     
    Ultimately, it's not a matter of "Will one thing prevail over another thing?", because they both perform different roles in the gaming community.
     
    And yes, I watched the heck outta some Power Rangers. That was my jam, dawg.
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