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Asharonapaul

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  1. Like
    Asharonapaul reacted to Purple Phantom for a blog entry, Stealth and Trickery   
    Hey everyone! In this blog post, I want to illustrate what's become my favourite thing to set up. Mild spoilers ahead.
     
    So, in the game, it starts out with three different levels where you control one of the three main characters - Matt, Tom and Edd. While I had a lot of fun setting up Matt's level, Tom's has quickly become my favourite, mechanics-wise. In Tom's level, you're in a factory of some kind, where you find Tord (who leaves pretty quickly) and all but one (human) member of the Red Army. Throughout the level, you find some information about what's being produced and learn a bit about the absent guy. Using what you find out about all of this, you can use a comm unit to get the three out of the building and shut down its production. You can even do multiple dialogue options to learn more information before you ultimately get them out of there. The catch? Well, there are two.
     
    One of them is paying attention. He may be whistling away and checking on machines, but if he sees you, he'll hunt you down. If you lose him, that's great and all, but he's patrolling around and making sure you can't hide much of anywhere for long. If you get caught and escape three times, he'll alert the other two, who will patrol around as well.
     
    If you don't have all the information, they'll catch on and begin patrolling - or worse, alert the guys not at the factory that one of the comm unit has been stolen. Cue everyone finding you like tracking missiles.
     
    Now, this isn't the only way to do this. You can lock them all in a room. You can singlehandedly take them out with a fire extinguisher. You can do both. It's up to you. There's one catch for all of them, though. This place is rigged to the brim with security cameras. Whatever method you do here cannot be used later in the game. These three will remember. Everyone else will study it. The robots will have protocols put in place so they don't fall for it.
     
    All in all, this has been one of my favourite things to make for this game. Let me know what you think!
  2. Like
    Asharonapaul got a reaction from lianderson for a blog entry, Ambition for a Long While   
    Oh wow. It's been a long while since I've blogged here. It's been a long time too, since I've belonged to an academia, or even dared to dream of university. Back in highschool, when geometry honors and pre calc were easy and full of joy to explore, I wanted to go to MIT. Everything I kept up on, was happening in MIT. AI, Robotics, all the things that were cutting edge were seemingly happening at MIT. Brilliance was what I thought of them.
    Fastforward and I'm a community college drop out with school debt living on government benefits struggling to understand the basic concepts of ACE or really any Object Oriented Language assisted Engine (like Unity, and so on).
    I had known about MIT open coarse-ware since I was enrolled in physics at a community college. I would watch a lecture on Electromagnetism every night, amazed with the content, thinking how cool it would be to use the information to build an electronic device never before seen. I ended up making a aluminium foil capacitor that held 2 volts for .25 seconds
     
    Now I'm here, finishing some reading on a MIT press book, Introduction to Algorithms.
     
    It's great. It talks about how the book is meant for not only a student teacher relationship, but also a reference manual for professional programmers, to help in creation/learning to create algorithms that always produce a given output from a provided input, are time efficient based on the resources available to execute the information, and without error. It's also a huge plunge into parts of math that remain unexplored for me. Like Weirmer functions, or newtons method, and some of finite math that's since slipped my mind after having tutored university students in the field.
     
    The first hurdle was getting the text book. It could not just be an ebook, I want to read it anywhere, and the entire planet isn't guaranteed to have the internet. And as I have learned, it may take me a long while to read all of what the book has to offer, the coarse I am following only has 25 lectures that cover a handful of chapters, wheras the book has a lot more chapters to offer. mainly the exploration of mathematics in it is of firm intrigue to me, should it suffice to be able to construct a method in ruby of it's principles, I should have no problem with the contents.
     
    Mom got me the book for an early birthday present. It's very well over 1200 pages. Just the preface alone was cause for me to desire to read chapter 1 the very next morning. All with the delighted hope of learning to craft algorithms that could solve and explore new aspects of reality for me.
     
    I began reading, and writing the exercises.
     
     
    I couldn't help be so excited about the idea of learning once more, in a field so vastly unlearned and yet so rewarding, that I upset a contact in a discord server. They ended up giving me a link to another discord server that focused on programming in general. I couldn't help but ignore the feeling of total devistation in having pissed someone off, for having found people that could help me grade myself as I progressed, so that I could correct myself and better apply my knowledge on the subjects in the book.

    Things checked out on my end for the answers.
     
    Such a short section with so much useful information, I had to keep going.
     
     
    after more principles, I had failed to realize something that should have been obvious, involving the direction of the book.
     
    regardless, I did my first problem of the book:
    I probably totally failed it, in that microsecond does not constitute 1000 of itself into a second. Had I paid attention in the non-existent weights and measures class they call elementary science, I would have known. But that's kind of a scaling issue as I found out from my implications.
    So one of the functions of f(n) was f(n) = log2(n)
    It wasn't so easy to solve. My first assumption was to create real values for n, and not some representative formula. My first attempts did not posses efficiency, because I am so under-educated about RUBY for one. After talking it over with ruby programmers on the server, I had arrived at this method for the solution
     
    My first thoughts are, why does that work. I still don't know. but if t is say, 2, the answer is 4, and so on, until we have a value where t = 1 second, it becomes large quickly. For a day the number n1 became so large that it was unmanageable for modern RUBY, so I had to introduce a factor. and being a decimal starting with 1 and having no other digit seems to have worked perfectly, scaling according to the t value.
    I did this sort of process for all 64 cells of the 8x8 table.
     
    Then I woke up and read chapter 2. And immediately was presented with a real world application for insertion_sort. An algorithm that mimics taking a handful of cards, and aligning them in a sequential order such that the elements are from least to greatest or greatest to least. It was also the first time I had seen pseudo code and attempted to use it as a structure for RUBY code.
     
     
    I toyed around with it for ages. Before reading the book further, and had hit a dead end. All of my debugging techniques couldn't make sense of the garbled mess of the array my method had made. When I read further, it explained that i = j = e. And its use of A[1..j-1] was saying what would happen in the next loop.
     
    def insertion_sort(an_array)
      size = an_array.length
      i = 0
      while i < size
        current = an_array
        j = i
        while j > 0 and an_array[j-1] > current
          an_array[j] = an_array[j-1]
          j -= 1
        end
        an_array[j] = current
        i += 1
      end
      return an_array
    end
    def insertion_sort(an_array) size = an_array.length i = 0 while i < size current = an_array[i] j = i while j > 0 and an_array[j-1] > current an_array[j] = an_array[j-1] j -= 1 end an_array[j] = current i += 1 end return an_array end this produced this result:

    And what I had mentioned earlier, of this being so obvious now. I had made this function before when I was making Classical Age World. It was my sort method for arranging the NPCs in a 2d array into family trees with relationships. I know on my walmar machine it will bog down on 10K entries. It might be more efficient now with the latest RUBY. the time coefficient being defined as:
    * insertion sort – c1n2
    Just from the table I had made, I know that N**2 is really not that great, but isn't the worse efficient coefficient algorithm. The worst on the table being, N!
    I went and did the method in GML, and it worked eventually.
     
    Now I can happily say I know an algorithm with it's application and relevance in programming. The book had me write an algorith to return Nil when a value is not in the array. To be honest I am not sure I understand the problem thorough.
    this was my guess at it
    Linear search: For j = 0 to A.length V = A[j] If A[j+1].defined? j = j + 1 else V = nil Break Anyways, I thought people would like to know about this particular journey as it develops.
  3. Like
    Asharonapaul got a reaction from lianderson for a blog entry, Ambition for a Long While   
    Oh wow. It's been a long while since I've blogged here. It's been a long time too, since I've belonged to an academia, or even dared to dream of university. Back in highschool, when geometry honors and pre calc were easy and full of joy to explore, I wanted to go to MIT. Everything I kept up on, was happening in MIT. AI, Robotics, all the things that were cutting edge were seemingly happening at MIT. Brilliance was what I thought of them.
    Fastforward and I'm a community college drop out with school debt living on government benefits struggling to understand the basic concepts of ACE or really any Object Oriented Language assisted Engine (like Unity, and so on).
    I had known about MIT open coarse-ware since I was enrolled in physics at a community college. I would watch a lecture on Electromagnetism every night, amazed with the content, thinking how cool it would be to use the information to build an electronic device never before seen. I ended up making a aluminium foil capacitor that held 2 volts for .25 seconds
     
    Now I'm here, finishing some reading on a MIT press book, Introduction to Algorithms.
     
    It's great. It talks about how the book is meant for not only a student teacher relationship, but also a reference manual for professional programmers, to help in creation/learning to create algorithms that always produce a given output from a provided input, are time efficient based on the resources available to execute the information, and without error. It's also a huge plunge into parts of math that remain unexplored for me. Like Weirmer functions, or newtons method, and some of finite math that's since slipped my mind after having tutored university students in the field.
     
    The first hurdle was getting the text book. It could not just be an ebook, I want to read it anywhere, and the entire planet isn't guaranteed to have the internet. And as I have learned, it may take me a long while to read all of what the book has to offer, the coarse I am following only has 25 lectures that cover a handful of chapters, wheras the book has a lot more chapters to offer. mainly the exploration of mathematics in it is of firm intrigue to me, should it suffice to be able to construct a method in ruby of it's principles, I should have no problem with the contents.
     
    Mom got me the book for an early birthday present. It's very well over 1200 pages. Just the preface alone was cause for me to desire to read chapter 1 the very next morning. All with the delighted hope of learning to craft algorithms that could solve and explore new aspects of reality for me.
     
    I began reading, and writing the exercises.
     
     
    I couldn't help be so excited about the idea of learning once more, in a field so vastly unlearned and yet so rewarding, that I upset a contact in a discord server. They ended up giving me a link to another discord server that focused on programming in general. I couldn't help but ignore the feeling of total devistation in having pissed someone off, for having found people that could help me grade myself as I progressed, so that I could correct myself and better apply my knowledge on the subjects in the book.

    Things checked out on my end for the answers.
     
    Such a short section with so much useful information, I had to keep going.
     
     
    after more principles, I had failed to realize something that should have been obvious, involving the direction of the book.
     
    regardless, I did my first problem of the book:
    I probably totally failed it, in that microsecond does not constitute 1000 of itself into a second. Had I paid attention in the non-existent weights and measures class they call elementary science, I would have known. But that's kind of a scaling issue as I found out from my implications.
    So one of the functions of f(n) was f(n) = log2(n)
    It wasn't so easy to solve. My first assumption was to create real values for n, and not some representative formula. My first attempts did not posses efficiency, because I am so under-educated about RUBY for one. After talking it over with ruby programmers on the server, I had arrived at this method for the solution
     
    My first thoughts are, why does that work. I still don't know. but if t is say, 2, the answer is 4, and so on, until we have a value where t = 1 second, it becomes large quickly. For a day the number n1 became so large that it was unmanageable for modern RUBY, so I had to introduce a factor. and being a decimal starting with 1 and having no other digit seems to have worked perfectly, scaling according to the t value.
    I did this sort of process for all 64 cells of the 8x8 table.
     
    Then I woke up and read chapter 2. And immediately was presented with a real world application for insertion_sort. An algorithm that mimics taking a handful of cards, and aligning them in a sequential order such that the elements are from least to greatest or greatest to least. It was also the first time I had seen pseudo code and attempted to use it as a structure for RUBY code.
     
     
    I toyed around with it for ages. Before reading the book further, and had hit a dead end. All of my debugging techniques couldn't make sense of the garbled mess of the array my method had made. When I read further, it explained that i = j = e. And its use of A[1..j-1] was saying what would happen in the next loop.
     
    def insertion_sort(an_array)
      size = an_array.length
      i = 0
      while i < size
        current = an_array
        j = i
        while j > 0 and an_array[j-1] > current
          an_array[j] = an_array[j-1]
          j -= 1
        end
        an_array[j] = current
        i += 1
      end
      return an_array
    end
    def insertion_sort(an_array) size = an_array.length i = 0 while i < size current = an_array[i] j = i while j > 0 and an_array[j-1] > current an_array[j] = an_array[j-1] j -= 1 end an_array[j] = current i += 1 end return an_array end this produced this result:

    And what I had mentioned earlier, of this being so obvious now. I had made this function before when I was making Classical Age World. It was my sort method for arranging the NPCs in a 2d array into family trees with relationships. I know on my walmar machine it will bog down on 10K entries. It might be more efficient now with the latest RUBY. the time coefficient being defined as:
    * insertion sort – c1n2
    Just from the table I had made, I know that N**2 is really not that great, but isn't the worse efficient coefficient algorithm. The worst on the table being, N!
    I went and did the method in GML, and it worked eventually.
     
    Now I can happily say I know an algorithm with it's application and relevance in programming. The book had me write an algorith to return Nil when a value is not in the array. To be honest I am not sure I understand the problem thorough.
    this was my guess at it
    Linear search: For j = 0 to A.length V = A[j] If A[j+1].defined? j = j + 1 else V = nil Break Anyways, I thought people would like to know about this particular journey as it develops.
  4. Like
    Asharonapaul got a reaction from DrassRay-Jacob for a blog entry, Music Am Language   
    So you probably have read where I claim music is a language, or more accurately, music am language. this has to do with a quote by Jesus I learned when I was 9, Ani, Sani, or I am, that I am. I merely replaced some words.
     
    My fascination with music began at a very young age, before preschool even. My mother had just wed my step father, and I messed around with a sound board and sang into a mic some beatles songs. But this excitement did not always carry over into the institutions. I hated recorder and music class throughout elementary school. I always felt too confined with that sort of thing, not only the institution of learning, but the instruments for which we were required to learn.
     
    It wasn't until I was about to enter middle school, that I fell in love with the Violin. At that time, the beauty in females was more noticeable for me. Needless to say when I saw a lovely red head playing the violin on stage, I wanted to make a sound as wonderful as her looks, and based on her playing, the Violin seemed like the answer. You can quote my parents, in that I never once squeaked as a beginner, but I know personally I did later on when I began to smoke the ganja.
     
    Smith Holden used to be the best place for orchestral musicians, and that is where I rented my first instrument. I don't recall the make or nationality, but it was decent to say the least. At one point I was playing on the piano while mother finalized the rental agreement, a Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsody, just the right hand part, and not necessarily chorded (piano is really difficult for me some how). Everyone thought it was a recording.
    Yet like elementary school, I found issues with being in orchestra. For one, the music we had to perform and learn was so boring, and unfamiliar beyond the institution.
     
    So I purchased a complete anthology song book of the Beatles. I taught myself to read sheet music with that book, because there wasn't enough time in class to be taught it by the instructor. Halfway through the year, I was allowed to perform Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds by myself. I could not tell if I was too new, or if the instrument lacked quality.
     
    My summer work earned me enough to purchase a Violin for myself. I tested a few instruments and found a nice German instrument from 1828 that was really good quality. It was lightweight, and had a great range of tonality. I don't recall the maker.
     
    In highschool my stepfather, by then x stepfather, hired me a private instructor for the violin. And we perfected beatles songs, until I got bored with the repetition, so I journeyed into the deep end of the musical spectrum. My first classical manuscript I purchased was Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D minor. It took me a few years to really become comfortable playing it, and since then I have yet practiced it, so it would take a few weeks or months of recitle to play it nicely today. Under his instruction, I listened to a well renowned musician of his time, Jascha Heifetz. He plays a lot of the classical works I play today, and was considered to be God's Fiddler, a most appropriate musician to look up to.
     
    Then I expanded into Max Bruch, and Bach, and Paganini's caprices (though only one of them I know how to play proper), and Chopin, more of Lizst and whatever the conductor of the orchestra had us recite. I never really made first chair, in middle school I was first chair of the first violin section for a minute, but when I was unable to keep pace with the conductor, I was moved back a seat. In highschool, I went between 3rd chair and 4th chair quite often in the first violin section.
     
    My German instructor did something delightful my sophmore year, he gave me a copy of Finale 2001 for my personal use. I composed five songs, most of which were scored for violin, and out of my ability to play. But I really did my better compositions by recording improvisations and transcribing with blank manuscript. What sounds good from a machine doesn't always work for abilities.
     
    When I went to alaska, as I had mentioned before, there was an athabaskan that had caught my eye. I even played a few pieces in front of her. but there was one I had never showed her. The crew I worked with was international, and they were always trying to get me to break out my violin on the job. And there came a moment where I was with a russian friend, and I heard a melody play, so I played it back. I spent years perfecting it. But when I heard it, I was thinking of the athabaskan girl. Hence it is something different... There is a part where it goes into A maj, and sounds irish to some, but from my understanding, it is the Inuit take on the fiddle playing of the irish, sort of. I recorded it in California on a newer instrument, so the quality may not be the same, it has been played on a total of three violins that I am aware of. I wrote it out as well, and have the xps and printed copies, but I think not all the rythms translated.
    the naming was a suggestion while living at a place called, The Place. 
    I came home, and the worse thing happened ever. While I was at work, and my mother was out working, my brother took my violin, placed it outside the garage in the freezing rain, and set it ablaze with lighter fluid. When my mother returned home, she beat him with the instrument beyond repair. He was later sent to an psych hospital/home, as it was his first problem since being diagnosed schizophrenic on top of being autistic. I was not able to afford a new instrument until I was working with the Department of Natural Resources, they payed well.
     
    Yugene had a Stradivarius remake, never before owned, that sounded 20 times better than any instrument I had ever owned. He used a specific type of rabbit hide glue he informed me. I signed a contract for a 300$ a month payment plan, for 5 months, 100$ down. That's when I bought cat gut synthetic core strings. All my music sounded so much better to me personally, and to those that heard it as well.
     
    It was called Qimera, or Wandering Dream, the idea that the perfect sound changed with the ages; that perfection even in music evolved much like language. That instrument went as far as Italy and Amsterdam with me, to New Mexico and Florida. Sadly, when I was fired from Yellowstone, the bridge broke and the sound post slipped, as I was unable to keep it away from the winter air; so I left it with an older woman at a hotel. I tried calling her to get it back, but never did, she had pawned it, despite the fact she said she would keep it safe.
     
    Now I am learning to repair and make instruments such as violins and cellos and bass and violas, as an apprentice to a master luthier. It is quite the endeavor, and requires many hours of repetition and learning. So far I can make a sound post from a block to within .02 mm of specifications, and can glue up ribs to front and back and blocks, and can shape cleats. There is much that requires observation foremost.
     
    When I was in California, I had no instrument, so I mostly sang whatever came to mind. My Grand Uncle Jim and Grand Aunt Karen surprised me one visit back home, with a brand new Shop Violin. It is currently what I play on, it is ok, but I think it could be better, it's quite heavier than the german or spanish one. And eventually I purchased a copy of Finale 2014 for unlimited voicing arrangement options so I can finally get around to composing that symphony. I had attempted a symphony in high school, called The Ice Man, after the cherokee legend/myth.
     
    The funny thing is, my brother even bought me a guitar when I returned as if it was an issue still. I'm terrible at guitar.
  5. Like
    Asharonapaul got a reaction from JuJu for a blog entry, RPG's and the Age of You   
    So gaming has really been around since, well, imagination most likely. The first games were simple and involved storytelling. And Storytelling is key to the types of games we are all likely addicted to play or create. It's primitive in nature, and eloquent in design. The real bare bones of a game is in the story, even it's something you put a quarter in to play. Think of all the different types of Pinball games out there; if you've never been to an arcade and have Windows, just think about the pinball on windows 95 and later. Ya, it has a story. And you're always the protagonist.
     
    I haven't seen to many games that had you play the antagonist, but if you think about it, what if Bowser was the Protagonist, and God had told him to capture the princess and prevent Mario (YOU) from impregnating her with the Antichrist.... Ya, it could happen.
     
    To really captivate a player into a game, there must be a few things for any style of game:

    Storyine
    Plot
    Options

    Even if it is as simple as a single button and joy stick, Pong gives the player the ability to spin the ball. But we're not really going to delve into those types of games, we're interested in RPGs.
     
    The list above still applies. It doesn't matter what depth you give those options, but number 1 should be something that makes the human player think there is quality in the gaming experience. It should not confuse or dwindle their interest. Now if you've no experience in writing stories, there are plenty of resources available for learning how, such as writing forums, and there are some members here that write stories for fun. I'm going to use some jargon I picked up from the writing world in my endeavors to be a published author.
     
    Any good storyline has an inciting conflict. The way things fell apart. And before that, character driven turn of events which lead to that conflict. A story is massive really, it can be the entirety of all the universe, but for a book or game, we aren't interested in everything. Only what is important to the Plot.
     
    Mostly, the storyline should cover the following:
    How did we arrive where we are?
    What must be done to prevent or achieve something?
    The Premise

    Of all of those, the Premise is all of them, sort of, and the most important of all. So if you need an example of a Premise, Rescue the Princess from Bowser. Simple, right? Your game doesn't have to be complex, but the Premise should be something that hooks the player. I mean, even Pac man had a premise, and everyone has played it once in their lives, either on console, pc, or atari. So make a good hook, and you'll have players for a long time.
     
    The plot is really key to getting the premise out to the player. You know, it holds the hook and all. It should also contain the setting. Mostly, the plot needs to have a few things, which give the player understanding, or should be shaped by the player, if you're going for something like that.
    Who
    What
    When
    Where
    Why
    How

    Now, all of those should be answered by the plot. Character driven plots are more rich in my opinion, where a character not going through a turning point determines one if not all of those for a given moment in the plot. But now to the meat of this article.
     
    YOU
     
    Players that really enjoy the classics might not like a fully rendered 3d version of the same game, although some do, and the markets reflect that. And not everyone wants to be able to make choices other than when to attack or how to attack, or if they should open a chest. But if you want to make something more complex, that means more investment on the part of the player.
     
    Game design for RPGs have really evolved over the years. The Quest was the first RPG to offer any sort of real storyline to the player, that wasn't basic or primitive, and you got to fight dragons, which has been paramount to the RPG experience for many years. Later we got better graphics, and even more storyline content with Final Fantasy Series on Nintendo and Super Nintendo. Genesis wasn't really one to embark on the RPG experience to my knowledge, but please inform me if that is not true. Now we can create what we look like, and some even offer personalities based on race.
     
    The further we advance, the more input is needed on the part of the player. Hardcore gamers love it. But the old school elites might not. But with engines like MV, or ACE we can offer modern experiences to the Old School crowd.
     
    Now a lot of games offer trophies and achievements through their distributors, such as the PSN or Steam. But I don't see that as necessary to enjoying a game, so much as showing a friend proof that you died to a trap five times in Terraria. Real fun in my opinion is in the character you play as. No one wants to invest in someone they don't like alot. So the character by default should have some good qualities that are relatable to anyone playing your game.
     
    There are more to Options than just how to kill. In my opinion, looks of your character for the game, as well as behavior when interacting should be something to implement, as well as a personal backstory. Now it may be difficult to introduce a way to write a bio for the player that isn't somehow a defaulted experience, but there are ways to introduce customization of the process. Such as having a journal/log of certain things not related to quests or battles, like how the character feels or thoughts about things.
     
    Backstory can be things like prologues and epilogues, as well as histories of the playable characters. Those are really important in making the game convincing. If you want the player to kill a dragon for instance, don't make the backstory something leading us to believe its not possible, or a decision to be made by that character. give it reason and meaning.
     
    Then you have to decide, how to handle skills and abilities. I for one, am a fan of investment style skill trees, or even investment style stats. That just offers so much more for the player to be able to choose their play style, rather than forcing them to play to the style of your game. This leads to longer development stages, and takes a lot more time to work out bugs and balance everything, but the time is worth it.
     
    I will write up a follow up later.
     
    Catch you next star!
  6. Like
    Asharonapaul got a reaction from JuJu for a blog entry, RPG's and the Age of You   
    So gaming has really been around since, well, imagination most likely. The first games were simple and involved storytelling. And Storytelling is key to the types of games we are all likely addicted to play or create. It's primitive in nature, and eloquent in design. The real bare bones of a game is in the story, even it's something you put a quarter in to play. Think of all the different types of Pinball games out there; if you've never been to an arcade and have Windows, just think about the pinball on windows 95 and later. Ya, it has a story. And you're always the protagonist.
     
    I haven't seen to many games that had you play the antagonist, but if you think about it, what if Bowser was the Protagonist, and God had told him to capture the princess and prevent Mario (YOU) from impregnating her with the Antichrist.... Ya, it could happen.
     
    To really captivate a player into a game, there must be a few things for any style of game:

    Storyine
    Plot
    Options

    Even if it is as simple as a single button and joy stick, Pong gives the player the ability to spin the ball. But we're not really going to delve into those types of games, we're interested in RPGs.
     
    The list above still applies. It doesn't matter what depth you give those options, but number 1 should be something that makes the human player think there is quality in the gaming experience. It should not confuse or dwindle their interest. Now if you've no experience in writing stories, there are plenty of resources available for learning how, such as writing forums, and there are some members here that write stories for fun. I'm going to use some jargon I picked up from the writing world in my endeavors to be a published author.
     
    Any good storyline has an inciting conflict. The way things fell apart. And before that, character driven turn of events which lead to that conflict. A story is massive really, it can be the entirety of all the universe, but for a book or game, we aren't interested in everything. Only what is important to the Plot.
     
    Mostly, the storyline should cover the following:
    How did we arrive where we are?
    What must be done to prevent or achieve something?
    The Premise

    Of all of those, the Premise is all of them, sort of, and the most important of all. So if you need an example of a Premise, Rescue the Princess from Bowser. Simple, right? Your game doesn't have to be complex, but the Premise should be something that hooks the player. I mean, even Pac man had a premise, and everyone has played it once in their lives, either on console, pc, or atari. So make a good hook, and you'll have players for a long time.
     
    The plot is really key to getting the premise out to the player. You know, it holds the hook and all. It should also contain the setting. Mostly, the plot needs to have a few things, which give the player understanding, or should be shaped by the player, if you're going for something like that.
    Who
    What
    When
    Where
    Why
    How

    Now, all of those should be answered by the plot. Character driven plots are more rich in my opinion, where a character not going through a turning point determines one if not all of those for a given moment in the plot. But now to the meat of this article.
     
    YOU
     
    Players that really enjoy the classics might not like a fully rendered 3d version of the same game, although some do, and the markets reflect that. And not everyone wants to be able to make choices other than when to attack or how to attack, or if they should open a chest. But if you want to make something more complex, that means more investment on the part of the player.
     
    Game design for RPGs have really evolved over the years. The Quest was the first RPG to offer any sort of real storyline to the player, that wasn't basic or primitive, and you got to fight dragons, which has been paramount to the RPG experience for many years. Later we got better graphics, and even more storyline content with Final Fantasy Series on Nintendo and Super Nintendo. Genesis wasn't really one to embark on the RPG experience to my knowledge, but please inform me if that is not true. Now we can create what we look like, and some even offer personalities based on race.
     
    The further we advance, the more input is needed on the part of the player. Hardcore gamers love it. But the old school elites might not. But with engines like MV, or ACE we can offer modern experiences to the Old School crowd.
     
    Now a lot of games offer trophies and achievements through their distributors, such as the PSN or Steam. But I don't see that as necessary to enjoying a game, so much as showing a friend proof that you died to a trap five times in Terraria. Real fun in my opinion is in the character you play as. No one wants to invest in someone they don't like alot. So the character by default should have some good qualities that are relatable to anyone playing your game.
     
    There are more to Options than just how to kill. In my opinion, looks of your character for the game, as well as behavior when interacting should be something to implement, as well as a personal backstory. Now it may be difficult to introduce a way to write a bio for the player that isn't somehow a defaulted experience, but there are ways to introduce customization of the process. Such as having a journal/log of certain things not related to quests or battles, like how the character feels or thoughts about things.
     
    Backstory can be things like prologues and epilogues, as well as histories of the playable characters. Those are really important in making the game convincing. If you want the player to kill a dragon for instance, don't make the backstory something leading us to believe its not possible, or a decision to be made by that character. give it reason and meaning.
     
    Then you have to decide, how to handle skills and abilities. I for one, am a fan of investment style skill trees, or even investment style stats. That just offers so much more for the player to be able to choose their play style, rather than forcing them to play to the style of your game. This leads to longer development stages, and takes a lot more time to work out bugs and balance everything, but the time is worth it.
     
    I will write up a follow up later.
     
    Catch you next star!
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