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Found 11 results

  1. Hey!... what? Where was I? Where was I?! Uhm… I took a sabbatical, went to find myself, studied on my head in the mountains of Mongolia: that sort of thing. Okay, okay. I got a new job, this time doing what I went to college for, and I lost track of time. A lot of time. I posted the second part of this in June of last year! It’s almost June of this year! Anyway, you’re here for more writing stuff, right? Well, I know what you’re thinking: Juju! You’ve already yakked for hours about linear narrative, and you’ve even talked about story props and proper skiing techniques. What else is there to talk about? Well, since we talked about starting the story, and continuing the story, what about ending the story? Consider this: You, the reader, have found a book that is the beat-all, end-all to every book you've ever read before. The characters are great, the plot is intriguing, you've cried twice, and now, at the end, at the very end!--it sucks. Like, crash and burn, third degree burn, burnie mac but without the comedy. You've spent the past ten weeks of your life slowly slogging through this giant book, biting your nails to nubs in concern for the leading heroine, heart pounding at the peril of the hero in the hands of the villian, and now what? You feel like you've wasted your life, right? "It's not about the end, it's about the journey." That's Book Sacrilege (BS) and you know it! It's always been about the end! You wasted spent ten weeks of your life leading up to learning about that end! You're legitimately mad! I think you can see where I'm going with this. Y'all smart. So you don't want your players to spend ten weeks, or even ten minutes, on your game just to see that it ends up nowhere. They've skied down that mountain slope only to end up in a disappointed heap at the bottom. Oops..... (wince) So, I guess what you're saying is: YOU HAVE A GOOD STORY, BUT HOW DO YOU END IT? The first thing to do is to relax. You're not alone. Every author has had this moment. I can name a million quotes about how the story never really ends, you just choose to stop telling it, yadda yadda yadda. But I won't, because we're talking video game stories. And ending them right. And time's short. Secondly, we have to understand a little about conflict progression and resolution. Any Engish / Lit teacher will tell you that stories usually follow this pattern, because... it works. I would ask that, for a more detailed view, please look at the nice words and nicer pictures on this website. But I'll give you the most basic of basic outlines, for your viewing pleasure. First of all, we got the beginning. In the beginning, you have CONFLICT PROGRESSION. There's a problem for the character, and it's getting worse. Let's use my favorite Shakespeare play for reference: Taming of the Shrew. What's our conflict, and its progression? Easy: All these dudes want to get their grubby palms on Bianca, but to do that they have to find someone to marry her mean-tempered, incredibly smart, bossy SHREW of a sister, Kate. Now, no man in his right mind is gonna marry her! There's our problem. Second, we have what's called the middle, where we lead up to THE CLIMAX. Now, the climax is the highest peak in the story where everything goes to HFIL by falling off Snake Way, so to speak. In our example, this would be the wedding between Kate and Petruchio, and his "taming" of her. Basically, she ends up marring a guy even crazier than she is and this is a bit of a problem for her. Last, we have the RESOLUTION, or the end. Now, this would be Bianca's wedding in our example, but the end is where everything simmers down and is, well, resolved! Or not, depending on your sequel status. But it never grows back up to the hectic frenzy of the climax, that's for sure. Now, when looking at the story you've lovingly crafted, fed, bathed, treated as your own child: where's your progression? Your climax? Knowing these things makes it far easier to know where your end will be. After all, once you go on the straight and narrative--er, narrow--path, you don't often stray from it. In that story, at least. Thirdly, we have to think about what sort of ending it is that you're going for. By that, I mean that you need to think long and hard about what you want the player to take away from your game. After all, the ending is the last bit they're see, and it's one of the things that will stay with them the most. Now, the rule of thumb is that the story MUST show some sort of progression. That is, the main character needs to come away with a better understanding of his world, himself, and his place in said world by the end of the tale. This, of course, may not always be a good thing. He may do all these 'great' deeds only to understand that he was unwillingly a pawn and therefore an aid to the bad guy. Or he might even BE the bad guy. Think about, if you have played it, "The Illogical Journey of the Zambonis." If you have not played it, go play it now and then come back, because it's something you need to know. Also, spoilers below. The Zambonis lesson isn't always a happy one, but it's one they needed to learn. There's morality in that game, I tell you what. That's just the thing. I can't write your endings for you, no one can. They, like your story, have to be as original as you are. (insert angelic chorus). But you can write your stories. Think about your characters. What are their flaws? What should they learn about themselves by the end of the game? What should the player learn about them? After all, they're the ones going in blind. Think about your own favorite--or not so favorite--endings. What went wrong? Look at it, learn it dissect it, BE IT if you must. But think about it. Follow your story progression. Look at all angles. The end... it's already inside of you. Actually, that's all I have this time around. I hope that's helpful; I feel as though it wasn't quite as helpful as my other parts, but this is the series finale. If the ending to this is about endings, and it's a bad ending... don't take my advice. Heh, heh.... (clears throat). Anyway, I'm off to enjoy government-run America and corporate benefits. See ya!
  2. Hello all, This is my first time posting on here and my first time using any game developing software. I am having a bit of trouble creating some interior walls for a house and school using the default tiles. Are there any tips into creating walls in rpg maker 2k3?
  3. freakytapir

    On Gear, Part 1, Weapons.

    I know it's been over a year, but it's good to be back again. Apparently having a full-time jobs cuts into your Blog and Game making time, who knew ? Today I want to talk about the gear in my game, more specifically weapons and armor, and why I chose to trim it all the way back. Now that I've been away from my game and had some time to think, I wondered, why does my game need heaps and heaps of weapons and armour? It is not the focus of my game, it will lead to endless menu micro-managment because of all the splitting up and regrouping of parties, endless shopping trips and grinding, because every character (up to 20) needs to be kept up to date on gear, it affects balance if they are under or over equipped, … The list goes on and on and on. So I made a seemingly radical choice. I dumped weapon and armor upgrades. Now don't get me wrong, there is still gear to be found, but no piece of equipment is “strictly better” then any other. To illuminate : strictly better is a term that I first heard about in Magic the gathering. It means “Identical in every way except the numbers are better”. Applied to RPGs, this would mean tossing your dagger for a mythril dagger because it is identical to the dagger, but has a higher attack stat. There is no reason to use the dagger over the mythril dagger. In some games, this is part of the fun, and it certainly has it's place in games, but not in mine, not with the character focus I wanted to have. So I did away with the endless mill of +1 swords and chose a different path : Incomparables. Meaning I wanted no weapon to be mathematically better then any other, but unique and different. As people who may have read my Elements ands skills blog post might remember, all of my elements are intrinsically different. For example, fire raises the users magic attack, lightning is luck based , … Now what if I did the same for my weapons and armour. This necessitated my split of physical damage into 3 categories to allow for variety : Piercing , Slashing an Crushing. Each of these types has its own damage formula. Piercing ignores part of the targets defense, Crushing deals more if the targets hp is low, and Slashing deals more if the users hp are high. A weapon can have more than one damage type, for example, a morningstar is both piercing and crushing. Some skills require the use of the correct type of weapon. Next, I divided my weapons into 9 weapon types, with each type getting about 3 weapons : Sword, Dagger, Axe, Hammer, Spear, Peasant, Bow, Gun and Artillery. Each of these categories has an additional effect: Swords are Skillfull, which means that they generate more TP when used. Daggers are Fast, which means they raise the users agility. ( I use a ctb battle system, so agility is very important) Axes are Punishing which means more damage on debuffed opponents. Spears have Reach, which gives the users a big bonus on counterattacks Hammers are Pulverizing, dealing more damage on a crit. Peasant Weapons have Underdog, which means that when the users has a stat buf, the effect is greatly increased Guns have Penetrate which means they ignore physical defence, and just deal damage equal to a.atk stat instead of a.atk²/b.def. Bows are Silent, generating way less noise, therefore not raising the alert level as much. Artillery has Unavoidable, meaning they negate block, and deal unresistable (Almighty) damage. On top of that is the small, medium, large system. Small weapons can be dualwielded. Medium weapons are the standard, and allow a shield or small weapon in the off-hand. Large weapons deal splash damage. Each weapon also adds a skill unique to that weapon. So to bring it all together, some examples : The longsword is a Medium Slashing and Piercing Sword, so it can be wielded with a shield or small weapon in the off hand, it deals more damage if the user is at high hp, generates more TP, ignores part of the targets defence and allows the users to use Slashing and Piercing Skills. It has the ability to let the user enter a parry mode as a special ability. The Quarterstaff ( different from a mage's staff) is a Large Bludgeoning Peasant weapon. So it deals Bludgeoning damage, deals more damage if the target's hp is low, raises the users attack when buffed with something, deals damage to multiple enemies when attacking and allows the use of Bludgeoning skills. As a special ability, it raises the users block, and counts as a shield. Most of this is realised by using Yanfly's Weapon Unleash system, to give every weapon an different attack skill, instead of filling up the formula bar with 200 if-statements.
  4. Hello all, Just thought that I would share a bit about my game development experience in these past 2.5 years to those that are willing to listen. Hopefully someone finds this interesting or helpful. 2.5 years ago, I had an ambitious goal to make one of my stories come to life. As a programmer, making a video game had always been a dream of mine and I thought what better time to make a game than now? I knew from the beginning it was going to be a difficult journey, so I researched all I could at first before fully committing to the project. Even with all the research, there were numerous factors I did not foresee and things I wish I had taken into account. After finishing the basic framework and refining the game mechanics, I gathered several talented friends and pitched them my idea. Despite the small budget, we had to work with, everyone was on board. Development was progressing and I started seeing my dreams become reality. Unfortunately, my team members begin to lose interest as time progresses. This was when I learned the importance of team morale and the difficulty of commitment. There was a period of time when I was the only person working on the project, and had wanted to quit several times myself. But then, I realized I have too much attachment to my project so I continued to persevere and it was well worth it. Eventually, developing the game became an enjoyable experience rather than a struggle. The whole process opened my eyes It broadened my experience in not only coding and debugging, but also art, sound design, and how to effectively convey mood through the environment. I became more independent, having to take on multiple roles because the team spirit we had was just not there anymore. I did not have a concrete road to follow, but I knew that if I wanted to see this project through to the end, I had to get my team back on board. Team management and sustaining everyone’s motivation took a lot more out of me than I expected, but the hard work paid off. I eventually managed to finish a “skeleton†version of the game and rekindled the spirit of the core members on the team. With everyone back together, we established a clearer direction to the game and it really helped align everyone’s vision. As we progressed, I realized how limited our resources really were. Our team was too small, and we really needed more experts in different fields. This was when I learned another valuable lesson in game development. Sometimes, reaching out for help and being willing to pay for quality work can go a long way. I started to pay for quality work from several different artists and the impact it had was beyond my expectations. After seeing how much the art affected the whole game, I became more willing to save a little more of my paycheck to invest in the game. There were rough patches along the road, but we managed to sew most of the game together and I’m very proud to say that the game is nearing 100% completion! Reflecting back on the experience, I really wish I spent more time finding the right motivation for each individual on the team to continue with the project early on. This was a critical mistake and it set us back more than I’m willing to admit. I also wish I spent more time figuring out the best quality of each team member and better utilized their talents from the beginning. Due to my lack of experience in game development, I spent a lot of time focusing on improving my knowledge, but neglected the team in the process. Even so, I’m very content with the state that the game is at today and I couldn’t have done it without the hard work and perseverance of my team. A word of advice to anyone attempting to create an indie game with a small group: Be a team, be willing to spend on quality, and be patient. Whether the game is successful or not, the work we have done so far has definitely been worth the effort. Seeing an idea come to life is one of the most satisfying rewards. I’m uncertain where the game will go from here, but I am excited to take the next step to really getting our game out there. Finally, I leave you all with a list of Dos and Don’ts that I learned from my experience. Hopefully it can help someone. Do: Use an existing game engine, it will save a lot of time. Research up on games with the same genre and study them to get ideas. Write up a story/gameplay script and go over it with your team to compromise on a vision before jumping into development. Hold multiple sessions with the team in gathering feedback, ideas and criticisms. Have a test run of the game often to find bugs and glitches. When fixing problems, always strive to fix it fully, never give up on a problem just because it is difficult. Always think of the players and how much fun they will have playing the game. Having a good GUI is very important. Be willing to spend a bit of money if you can for quality work. The impact is surprising. Invest time in fueling the team spirit. Your team is everything. Don’t: Throw away artworks that artists draw for you, be resourceful. Depend too much on others to help you all the time, you will be on your own sometimes. Give up on your team members, each have quality talents that need to be utilized correctly. Give up on yourself, quality work requires perseverance. Rush the game and release an unfinished product. It is better to take it slow and deliver something with more quality. For those interested, check out our game project at: http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=887509287
  5. HOW WRITE GOOD, PART 2: DON'T DO THE THING Hey! What, you're back again? I didn't scare you off the first time? Wow... okay. A little unexpected, but okay. So, how did the story go? Mhmm... Mhmm.. ah, okay. So you: HAVE A STORY, BUT IT KEEPS ENDING UP TOO PREDICTABLE/ IT'S HARD TO KEEP TRACK OF WHAT'S GOING ON? Okay, I think I can help with that. Sit here, and let's talk about it. So you've got the story. But somehow, it keeps slipping down the mountain on one ski, ending up at the bottom in a crumpled heap so predictable that the player can see the end coming from the first thirty seconds of descent. It seems like everything's at a loss, because you can't figure out how to keep the story from crashing, despite knowing the linear narrative and all that other stuff we talked about last time. Well, here's the problem. We gotta keep that story from crashing and burning. How? Well, let's see. Why don't we try giving the story TWO skis instead of one? And maybe some ski poles so they can guide themselves down the slope? Boots and bindings would be a good thing too, so the story can actually stay on whatever ski it has, whether one or two. Are you getting the metaphor yet? I hope so... To explain in more detail: a story with no supports is the same as a skier with no supports. It's not going to end well for anyone. What the heck are supports, you ask? How can a story have supports? Well... let's think about our story from last time. A small girl with red hair lives in a shabby house on the edge of a futuristic city; she goes from her house to find her missing mother. By itself, this is technically a story. And depending on what we decided to do with our narrative, it's a good game. But it's still a little.... lackluster. How can we fix this? With supports, of course! Support #1: Setting Wait a minute, wait a minute! You say. We know the setting already, Juju! It's a futuristic city! Yes, but... do you know what atmosphere means? Not air you breathe atmosphere, but aesthetic atmosphere. This city... the girl's house is shabby. It's safe to say she doesn't live in a very futuristic part of the city. More likely, she lives in the slums. Why would there be slums in a futuristic city? What sort of people live there? Let's say, for instance, that to survive in the city as a healthy citizen, you have to pass an aptitude test that places you with a job. (a la Divergent series, almost). Those people who can't pass the test for whatever reason have no other choice but to live in poverty on the outskirts of the city. By extension, this would mean that the girl's mother also failed the test. Does this failed test play some part in her disappearance? Hmm... Is there more to the plot than meets the eye? All of this can be gleamed just from the setting of the story. Wow! Support #2: Characters and Their Locations What kind of story would it be without characters? Well, there are a few games that have only one or two characters, but in our game, we have a whole city's worth! That's a lot of work.... or is it? Get out your linear narrative that you've written in your word processor, or in the back of that shabby notebook that holds a few papers from tenth grade and a crude drawing of your gym teacher. Here's where we map out where our character will go. What do you mean, Juju? Well, again, it all comes down to organization. Personally, I use Excel for this, but in most word processors there's an option to make a table that will do basically the same thing. What we're going to do is write down where the character will go and what they might find there. For our game, I'll include a downloadable example. Let's say that the redheaded girl goes to the bus stop, an office building, a seedy diner, the neighborhood near her house, and finally a warehouse. In my real game that I'm making, there's about 15 of these. IMPORTANT: THESE ARE NOT THE NUMBER OF MAPS YOU HAVE (well, they can be, but I don't use it that way). THESE ARE ONLY THE AREAS THE PLAYER AND CHARACTER GO TO! If you look at the attached example, you can see that there are 3--Count 'em, 3-- columns. They say "Name of Area", "Enemies", and "Key Scenarios". Of course, you can add more or less columns depending on preference. I've written the name of the areas, whether I expect any enemies to be encountered in said area, and if the area holds a valuable cutscene that's used to further the story. The best thing about this is that you can always leave your story, come back to it, and remember at the very least the bare basics of what you were planning on doing to it in the game. In terms of maps, each area can have as many maps as you like. There can be three maps in the bus station, for example: the outside, the inside, and the bus itself. This is also where you can start adding an important support: Characters. In my own organization, I have an excel workbook that has many, many tabs. These tabs are labeled things like: Enemies, Items, Key Items, Skills, Characters, Areas, etc. My Character tab has the name of the Character, a brief explanation of the Character, and what Area they can be found in. Some are just NPCs, others have Key Items for the player, and others help further the story in other ways. If you don't have Excel, you can easily add a Characters row to whatever table you're working with. Why the trouble, you ask? Well, think back to that aesthetic atmosphere. Have you ever watched a show, or played a game, and found that one NPC that struck a chord with you, or that one side character that you liked better than the hero/heroine? What if they hadn't existed. Would the game still be the same without them? Of course not! Good characters flesh out a story and make it more believable. And that's what we're trying to do- sell this story and its sincerity to the player. There are plenty of more supports that I could go into, if I had the time. For homework, read up on these links. They're hand picked by me, so you know they're good 1. R.R. Martin Tells You What's What (that's the Game of Thrones guy, for those of you who aren't into that sort of stuff) 2. World Building and You: How to be an Awesome God of Imagination 3. A Sum-Up of This Lesson and Part 1, but Written by Someone Else Is that everything? I think that's everything... oh. Wait. Before you go: Don't. Do. The. Thing. Okay, so you know how we've established that skiers need supports to stop from falling down and dying? Okay, a skier with protective suit and two skis and poles is fine. But a skier with five pillows, two sets of goggles, twelve poles, nine skies, and a big marshmallow helmet will crash and burn just as easily as one with only one ski! You can't juggle that many things going on! A story with too many supports will be as bad as one with no supports at all!!!! Okay, okay! You say. How can I tell? Easy. Remember what I said was the most important part of the story? Think hard, now. The main character must have a goal. Good job! Now, every time you add a support, think to yourself: how will this help my main character achieve their goal? Think about the ski thing again. We give our skier two skis, two poles, bindings, boots, a suit, and a helmet. This is to help them reach the goal of skiing to the bottom of the mountain and making it there in one piece without dying. Just the same, your supports MUST have a way of helping the main character to reach their goal one way or another, or else it's just extra baggage that'll weigh the story down until it has no way of moving forward. Like it? Am I still stupid and know even less than before? Can't wait for part 3? Let me know!
  6. Hmm? Oh, hello there! Come on in, I- what? No, I'm not busy! Come in a sit a spell! What's up? What's that? Writing tips? Sure, I've got writing tips! Oh, I see, you: WANT TO MAKE A GAME, BUT HAVE NO IDEAS / ARE NOT GOOD WITH IDEAS... You want to be a game designer and make cool games so that your friends will be like "Wow, cool game!" but you have no ideas on a story, or even how to begin a story, and you're beginning to stress because what if they put a ban on new games or something and you haven't finished and how do you start do you plan or just wing it or what's the starting point how do you find it-- Okay, just take a deep breath for me. Let it out, take another. Okay... good? Good. So, you're ready to make a game. Great! No ideas? Preposterous! Think of an idea right now. Well, let's start slower. Think of a guy. Any guy. Got him in your head? Okay, this guy has a family, or does he? Something happened to him. What happened? There's an idea. Make a game about it. Okay, maybe it's not that simple... No, it's really that simple! Ideas can come from anywhere, anything, any time. What do you like. Space? Make a game about an astronaut. Or cute planets trying to find their star. Chess? Okay, a white and a black chess piece travel across a board-world together. Gummy worms? Make a gummy worm harvesting simulator. "Well, Juju, I might have an idea now, but an idea is not a story." You're... right! It's not! But, how do you flesh out a story? Well, sit back down and let Juju clue you in on a very magical four letter word that happens to be a computer program: WORD. "...Word? Word!? That's your answer?!" Yep, that's my answer! Word, or Notepad, or Writing Software #3, or something! Write your idea down, and then think a bit. Here's some things to think about: Who's the main character of the idea? Are there any secondary characters? Will you allow for a happy ending, a sad ending, or both? Do you want to go a conventional route, or do you want to channel your inner M. Night Shyamalan and have a crazy plot twist? More important things to think about: How long do you want your idea's story to be? A few hours of playtime? A few days? How will your game assets fit in with your idea? What sort of assets would you need to find to make your idea come to life? What sort of scripts would you need? Is there anything your idea has that the RTP of RPG Maker can't do without a special script? When you have answers to these questions, then it's time to think about something called the LINEAR NARRATIVE. That's just a super fancy term that means a story that is told from beginning to end, without doubling back. For first-time writers, this is the easiest option. Doubling back usually means extra work and cross-referencing which, while good in its own way, is often rather confusing if not done right. In any case, this means that it's time to give your idea a beginning, middle, and end. "How do I do this?" you ask. Well, think of your idea. For example, let's say our idea is this: A girl lives in a house. Your idea may be more or less flourished. Still, let's first take our idea and... embellish it a bit. Let's add some adjectives and maybe even a preposition or two, shall we? A girl lives in a house. A small girl with red hair lives in a shabby house on the edge of a futuristic city. Look! With just 12 extra words, we've added so much to our idea! (applauds) But it's still not a story yet, is it? I mean, the girl's only LIVING, and not doing much else. Let's add more to the idea, using a semi-colon. (Grammar Reminder: One uses a semi-colon to add combine two full sentences; it doesn't work if you have a run-on sentence or a sentence fragment. ) A small girl with red hair lives in a shabby house on the edge of a futuristic city. A small girl with red hair lives in a shabby house on the edge of a futuristic city; she goes from her house to find her missing mother. Okay, great! We have our first, most simple outline! We've done the most important thing in the story-making process: We've given the main character a goal. Without a goal, the main character doesn't have a reason to do anything other than the norm, and the game won't exist! Okay, so you have to make a decision here. Does the girl find her mother, or does every effort turn up in vain? What sort of people live in this futuristic city? She's a small girl; what sort of challenges does she face all alone in this large place? Her house is shabby; is she too poor to afford bus tickets and has to go everywhere on foot, or does she have a bicycle or some other form of transportation? Answer these questions, and the story grows. Tip: It's easier to separate your story into three acts. The first act should set the story. For example, we'd show the girl, part of her life, perhaps her mother, and then we'd segue into act II, where her mother goes missing and she embarks on her journey to find her. This would lead to act III, where we'd show a climax. If you had a boss battle, the final boss would be in part III. We'd see her ending, and then her story is finished... for the moment. What else? Well, we have the story here, and if you wanted, you could even just leave it at that. But we can still add! Why did the mother disappear? Was she taken, or did she leave of her own initiative? The little girl, if the game is true to life, will have grown and learned on her lonesome journey. How will she face her mother after the events of her story? Will actions the player chose to take have an impact on the girl, and if so, how will the end of the game be affected? Will there be a cliffhanger for a sequel? Write all this down in your word document. Make notes. Wanna change something? Change it! Afraid you'll lose your progress? Nah! Write new ideas in different colors, so you can change without really changing a thing! Never be afraid to expand on your idea. Even if you think it's stupid and no one will like it. It's YOUR idea, and despite everything, if you take initiative on it and work hard, you're 100% guaranteed that someone, somewhere, will enjoy it. Remember: even the corniest movies get a cult following at some point. So get out there, and make some ideas! Like what you read? Can't wait for part 2? Think I'm stupid and the worst tutorial person ever? Let me know!
  7. Thebigzumawinz

    The start of a new project

    I have decided to work on an rpg like tales of the world with a battle system that takes you into a like platformer battle system where you have a stage and you can attack others in a fast pace combat arena. I have started making sprites of characters and monsters along with other sprites. I may just make a demo to see how far I can get it. Here are some stuff I have so have fun. Skill tree battle sprites
  8. So you hear a lot of news about a promising game (pun unintentional) only for it to be put on hold, significantly delayed or even cancelled. Even games with lots of funding are not immune to this (hello a lot kickstarter projects) I was wondering what you think the top reasons for a game failing are? Also any tips on avoiding said downfalls? From my own experience in the modding community and some old projects I had. Project Creep So many ideas so many scripts so many assets - you end up adding too much to your game and overwhelmed by management Too Ambitious You have some fantastic idea but you have too little experience or funding. If you're too reliant one feature which you can't implement easily your project maybe on indefinite hold. Lost interest You simply lose interest in your project due to real life situations or because you discover new ideas or concepts which make your game feel outdated or bad. As for advice fro my own experience Planning - having some overall plan of what out want from youur project and how you are going to execute it Small chunks - Don't they to focus on everything all at once - small progress is better than no progress Know your limits - understand what your skills are - learn new skills if you have time and build up a working demo or concept if your are looking for assistance and funds are limited Have fun! - making a game can sometimes feel like a job or chore but remember why you make a RPG game - you love the gameplay or want to tell story to an audience - it could your friends or fellow members here but the end result should be enjoyable.
  9. TBWCS

    2014 Game Development plans

    Since the past year, I have been planning the doujin games I wanted to create. Some of these are really a plan of mine back before the actual game making process, but because of the work I am receiving and my personal work, I have let it stayed on the note up till now. I scheduled all of these equally, so all of them would be produced chronologically. These doujin games include: Mekaku City Actors – Blindfold Gang Tea Party No Game, No Life – To Disboard! Kuroko no Basket – Kiseki RPG Scrapped Princess – Destinies Full Metal Alchemist Brotherhood Date A Live (Dating Game) Log Horizon I would also be doing some original games of original stories. The game titles include: Limitless Swords Limitless Dream Cerulean Core Pandora – Reasoning Battle Dragonsingers Dreamwalker So far, these are in line. I might throw in other games and they’re good to be produced, but since they aren’t fully decided yet, I’ll only post the definite ones.
  10. PoorCollegeGuy

    A Test Game (Day 1 with Commentary)

    I spent all day fiddling around with elements of RPGMaker and learning how to make some quests, and FINALLY I got around to getting some real gameplay done. Of course, none of it is finished, but it will give you a peek at my creative process. And as you will soon learn, I am dying to share whatever I can. Even if it is silly and clunky. Yay for airing dirty RPG laundry! This is the title screen. It's brilliance is in its lack of brilliance.There will be more here eventually, but for now I think there's actually something charming about having the default start screen. Reminds me of how far I have to go until I have anything that could be called a 'functioning game'. One of the joys of working with RPGMaker VX Ace is that you don't have to worry about spending money on stupid ideas. I've been feeling more free to try things that just sort of pop into my mind. For example, Tutorial Girl just sort of spawned from my desperation to have an opening cutscene. But then after the scene was finished, I reworked entire chunks of the game I had drafted out to include Tutorial in whatever way I could. Plus, I could put zingers in her mouth like this one. Look at that quality of writing! It's like whoever wrote that was very very very tired and needed to go to sleep. I was so excited that I was able to make my characters walk from one part of the screen to the other that I hadn't really worked out 'what they are walking around'. I've got a door to a pub and some NPC's that spew quests, but that's about it. Speaking of the pub though... Right now it's the most complete area in the game. It's still rough working, but all of the NPC's are interactable, and you can even dance for money. The drunk pirate pays in gold for you to dance. You can keep on dancing until he runs out. This is one of (hopefully) many activities that players can take part in once the game is finished. My plan is that if a player doesn't want to get into the combat, they don't have to. Like, at all. They can just do dumb stuff around town and the dungeons and still be able to get through the story. And that's all I really have to share for now. I'm actually quite proud of how much progress I was able to make in a day. The tone of the game is really starting to form in my mind, and this is a really nice light-hearted project to start with. You know, before I try and tackle something heartwrenching and emotional. That'll be next! Stay tuned for more random updates and thoughts! If you guys have thoughts or comments feel free to share them! I'm trying my best to learn the basics of making a game, so any input (even the insanely negative) is helpful.
  11. A horror game. I have been coding, eventing and designing a horror game for the last few months using Ace. Actually, I already started a bit of it and most of it were thoroughly checked (in terms of the events). However, I stumbled upon a big block of question on my game. Often, we create elements of surprise on a horror game to keep the game alive in terms of exploration, story, ambiance and theme. To start with the question, let me give these pointers first: I have been thinking of these elements on my game: Traps Some of the maps and stages of the game requires the player to pass some traps. These traps are either open or in secret to appear inside the game. It consists of getting the player hurt or trigger its death for game over. This is accompanied by a surprise since the player would not expect when these traps actually occur. Jumpscares Naturally, many horror games has this element of surprise. What happens with a jumpscare is you let the players get surprised with those surprising events inside the game, much likely when you've played Resident Evil, Silent Hill, Witch House, Lisa, Yume Nikki and Mad Father. Though my idea still lacks to which should the jumpscares I should exactly create. My question, what do you think should be added on the game to give a boost of its surprise factor, suspense factor or thrill factor? For those who are interested, here's a video of what my game exactly is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kkHLbfmemUM
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