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When creating a game, is it possible to give the player too many choices?

 

For example, give them 100 classes to choose from with 100 "extra/special" skillsets.

 

Can you give them too many magic types to choose from? Too many weapon types to choose from?

 

What is your thought on the subject?

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For a casual gamer perhaps it's too much. I love RPG's and been playing them since NES so personally I'd like it. If you're making a game for more seasoned gamers you should be fine. If you're trying to hit a wide audience, you should get some feedback from more casual gamers.

 

The biggest challenge, of course, is balancing all those elements and making them unique. 

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Okay, I reached 'WALL OF TEXT' limit for today, so I'll do it quick:

 

Too many things can be confusing.

Also many things are difficult to do for a developer, because it'd be better if each one would have original features.

 

THE END *whew that was hard*

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Choice for choices sake is bad.

 

If them 100 classes and all them skills do something fundamentally unique, then i'd say it's OK.

 

If you get copies of skills though, then they're skills that aren't needed.

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What I find confusing (maybe I am just dumb) is when there are tons of different ways to level up.  Like, go to this screen to use these points to level up these skills, but then these party combo abilities level up from these relationship points and then these consume this in exchange for improving that and these crystals allow you to change skills but only one works at a time so you just wasted time and items to overwrite your leveled up skill etc etc. 

 

Similarly for overly complicated crafting systems or whatever.  Just as games offer varying levels of difficulty to suit the player, make it so those who are really invested can really tinker and customize but more casual players can still enjoy the game and the mechanics.  Like, some games you can buy and sell for a profit based on what is in demand where.  I usually ignore that because I am too busy to be interested in keeping price lists, BUT it's nice to know that optional system exists for those who like it or if I'm really strapped for money.

 

With games that offer tons of weapons/armor/accesories, most of them I will never use.  I hate being excited that I got a new sword from accomplishing a quest or from a boss drop and it turns out the one I already have equipped is better in 9 out of 10 ways.

 

And, boss fights are different, but for regular battle encounters don't people generally just whack whack whack or cast the lowest MP spell that's effective without wanting to put thought or time into it?  If you can kill it in two turns anyway,  your 100 unique skills may just be ignored.

 

Hm, didn't mean to sound so negative.  I guess I'm saying, optional choices and useful choices are good.

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What I find confusing (maybe I am just dumb) is when there are tons of different ways to level up.  Like, go to this screen to use these points to level up these skills, but then these party combo abilities level up from these relationship points and then these consume this in exchange for improving that and these crystals allow you to change skills but only one works at a time so you just wasted time and items to overwrite your leveled up skill etc etc. 

 

Similarly for overly complicated crafting systems or whatever.  Just as games offer varying levels of difficulty to suit the player, make it so those who are really invested can really tinker and customize but more casual players can still enjoy the game and the mechanics.  Like, some games you can buy and sell for a profit based on what is in demand where.  I usually ignore that because I am too busy to be interested in keeping price lists, BUT it's nice to know that optional system exists for those who like it or if I'm really strapped for money.

 

With games that offer tons of weapons/armor/accesories, most of them I will never use.  I hate being excited that I got a new sword from accomplishing a quest or from a boss drop and it turns out the one I already have equipped is better in 9 out of 10 ways.

 

And, boss fights are different, but for regular battle encounters don't people generally just whack whack whack or cast the lowest MP spell that's effective without wanting to put thought or time into it?  If you can kill it in two turns anyway,  your 100 unique skills may just be ignored.

 

Hm, didn't mean to sound so negative.  I guess I'm saying, optional choices and useful choices are good.

I feel you. Happens to me in games like Oblivion, Skyrim, Reckoning, etc. My character in every single one has the best of everything so anything I get is useless. I don't sell them because I'm already rich and powerful. I rarely use potions so I don't buy a ton.

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Agree. Sometimes character stat/skill raising can take many hours just to understand how everything works.

Crafting can be sometimes even worse. =P

(things like Skyrim, some MMO's etc.)

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What I find confusing (maybe I am just dumb) is when there are tons of different ways to level up.  Like, go to this screen to use these points to level up these skills, but then these party combo abilities level up from these relationship points and then these consume this in exchange for improving that and these crystals allow you to change skills but only one works at a time so you just wasted time and items to overwrite your leveled up skill etc etc. 

 

You mean you don't want to have to know calculus in order to level your characters? I know what you mean. Sometimes it can feel like there are levels just for the sake of levels. It can get convoluted, if it's not organized well. Personally, I like having stat and skill points. That way, I can customize my characters however I want. Stat points for their uh... stats and skill points for a tree or web where you can choose which skills to learn or upgrade. MMO's usually have levels for crafting skills, too. It works well for those types of game. To me, it feels unnecessary in a single player RPG. 

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Agree. Sometimes character stat/skill raising can take many hours just to understand how everything works.

Crafting can be sometimes even worse. =P

(things like Skyrim, some MMO's etc.)

I shudder at the thought of Skyrim's crafting mechanics. 

 

"Oh, get this leather here and some gold, but wait! That item can only be obtained by higher level enemies! But wait again! Those enemies drop better loot! Le gasp!"

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Agree. Sometimes character stat/skill raising can take many hours just to understand how everything works.

Crafting can be sometimes even worse. =P

(things like Skyrim, some MMO's etc.)

I shudder at the thought of Skyrim's crafting mechanics. 

 

"Oh, get this leather here and some gold, but wait! That item can only be obtained by higher level enemies! But wait again! Those enemies drop better loot! Le gasp!"

 

Also, there were 99999 different crafting materials - my inventory and my house were full of things - now try to find one item in all that spam. =P

 

I loved one thing in Skyrim - Collecting every single cooking pot -> bringing them to my house -> putting them in one room -> Close the doors -> jumping on them, so the pots were floating around and pushing me all over the place -> ended up falling through the floor to an endless pit of doom.

 

Also I liked throwing frying pans at enemies while being hidden -> they started to search for me -> Didn't find me -> going back to their place and saying really stupid things like "My imagination is playing with me" (or something like this - I had Polish version so it can be inaccurate) -> throwing frying pan again -> the same thing -> "lol they're stupid xD"

 

That game was so much fun! xD

Edited by Rikifive

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Agree. Sometimes character stat/skill raising can take many hours just to understand how everything works.

Crafting can be sometimes even worse. =P

(things like Skyrim, some MMO's etc.)

I shudder at the thought of Skyrim's crafting mechanics. 

"Oh, get this leather here and some gold, but wait! That item can only be obtained by higher level enemies! But wait again! Those enemies drop better loot! Le gasp!"

 

Also, there were 99999 different crafting materials - my inventory and my house were full of things - now try to find one item in all that spam. =P

 

I loved one thing in Skyrim - Collecting every single cooking pot -> bringing them to my house -> putting them in one room -> Close the doors -> jumping on them, so the pots were floating around and pushing me all over the place -> ended up falling through the floor to an endless pit of doom.

 

Also I liked throwing frying pans at enemies while being hidden -> they started to search for me -> Didn't find me -> going back to their place and saying really stupid things like "My imagination is playing with me" (or something like this - I had Polish version so it can be inaccurate) -> throwing frying pan again -> the same thing -> "lol they're stupid xD"

 

That game was so much fun! xD

 

 

 

 

Oh god that made me laugh. xD I have to try that sometime. I like the whole bucket-over-the-head idea, then stealing all their stuff. :P I can agree however, that there were WAY too many items in that game. Gave a nice atmospheric feel though.

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I have the sudden urge to hide somewhere and throw a frying pan at my roommate. I didn't buy Skyrim for the simple fact that

I knew I would get way too caught up in it, and it would drain all my free time. Like what WOW did to an entire generation. 

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Skyrim does drain people's free time. There's just so much stuff in that game. xD AC: Unity, although buggy, is a good laugh sometimes, if you think that weird deaths and jumping from high ledges and dying are funny. :P 

 

On topic though, I like choices in games. Big fan of the Fable series. 

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Fable was interesting. I only played the third (free with my Xbox!) It had a ton of choices, but no level system. No character classes either. Simple yet complex. That's hard to pull off.

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Simple yet complex. That's hard to pull off.

Cube World was like that. Minecraft-ish, yet I never knew what to do or how to do it. That's just me being a beginner though. :P

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The problem I think is not too many choices, but rather when most of the becomes meaningless or impossible to explain. Are each of your classes or weapon types unique and functionally different from each other? You want to avoid having 20 fighter classes that basically only differ in what there skills are named or a bunch of weapon types that are statistically identical. Also can you actually deliver the information to the player they need to make a meaningful choice? You don't want to bury most classes in a long menu without much description of their features.

 

Personally I always preferred a lot of little choices with fewer options to one big one with a huge number of options. For example, instead of having a bunch of starting classes, have very few classes and make them customizable somehow, such as skill packages, specialties, weapon selection, subclasses, and so on. It makes a much larger number of total different builds while letting each selection pool remain small.

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The problem I think is not too many choices, but rather when most of the becomes meaningless or impossible to explain. Are each of your classes or weapon types unique and functionally different from each other? You want to avoid having 20 fighter classes that basically only differ in what there skills are named or a bunch of weapon types that are statistically identical. Also can you actually deliver the information to the player they need to make a meaningful choice? You don't want to bury most classes in a long menu without much description of their features.

 

Personally I always preferred a lot of little choices with fewer options to one big one with a huge number of options. For example, instead of having a bunch of starting classes, have very few classes and make them customizable somehow, such as skill packages, specialties, weapon selection, subclasses, and so on. It makes a much larger number of total different builds while letting each selection pool remain small.

I like that idea.

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