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Why So Whitewashed?

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@PhoenixSoul White Christian influence has been slowly devouring the entire planet since the Roman Catholic Empire, and it still is today.

 

 

On 10/7/2019 at 3:42 AM, Kayzee said:

You know, I was actually thinking of making one of the fairy characters in my game have dark skin. Yes fairies can have dark skin. Also green or blue or whatever other color of skin they want. At least a good percent of them are shapeshifters after all. Anyway, literally the only reason I was thinking of it was that her name (and her two friends) is a reference to a character in a web novel that happens to be black (her two friends aren't though). Though the thing is... The web novel character is hardly a flattering depiction of a black person, being a pretty demented sadistic bully of a 'superhero' with anger issues (to be fair though, the web novel is pretty clear that it's because of personal issues, there are other much more flattering black characters, and at least a large percentage of the targets of the worst of her anger are a gang of literal nazis). The character I named after the web novel character is also a bit sadistic as well, but much more playfully so, and I only added a touch of sadism to her character after I decided to name the three after the web novel characters. But she was a bit boring before so...

 

For reference, I decided to name them after the web novel characters (mostly, their names are similar but more cutesy) because they are kinda the recurring mini-boss goon squad of my game and ended up having the same hair colors of a trio of bullies in a web novel I like. There personalities are a lot different though.

 

Fairies don't really have a universal description or rule system of any kind. They've been heavily domesticated and reshaped by gross overuse in literature and pop culture. The old creatures of folk lore were in fact nefarious, mischievous entities, often spirits, not at all creatures of the mortal realm, and thus have no physical form.

 

What people think of as a fairy today, is 150% fiction, with almost nothing of the old lore remaining  intact.

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I know right? There is so much humans get wrong about fairies it's kinda hilarious. It doesn't help that there are so many types of things that sorta get sorta lumped together. For example, do you know the difference between a fairy, a pixie, and a sprite? Most people don't, or get it wrong! Did you know that depictions of fairies with wings only go back to about a hundred to two hundred years? Sure it's fashionable now, but hardly required. I think your first sentence there is a great way of describing fairies actually. Also trolls, believe it or not.

 

That said, you are only half right. What humans think of as a fairy today, is no more true or false then it was back then. I am a fairy myself you know, or like to pretend as such. Am I also 150% fiction? Of course I am! Everything I am comes from stories. Stories I have been told, and stories that I am telling. But here's the thing: You are no different, nor is the rest of the world. Reality may or may not exist and we may or may not be able to interact with it, but would we really honestly be able to tell? But we are still here aren't we? Truth or fiction, it doesn't really matter. What matters Is that we still exist.

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Well reality exists, and we can interact with it, that much I know for sure.

 

I love all folk lore, but I don't believe in it. There was a time in mankind's development when we didn't understand the laws and forces of the universe, and instead looked to superstition about gods, spirits, and monsters. Think of it like a human child. When it's young it believes in Santa, the Easter Bunny, and from time to time, gets a bad feeling there's a monster under the bed. But as it gets older, it begins to understand the laws and limitations of the world we're bound to.

 

Let's just say Fairies are real. Why just Fairies, though? Why that one mythical creature out of thousands, whilst the rest remain silly archaic stories? Why just one god being real out of hundreds?

 

As a man of science, it's impossible for me to go down this road.

Edited by That One NPC

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Hehe, I never said it was JUST fairies. And only one god? That's just silly! I never really said we were 'real' either, just that we exist. Perhaps we live inside stories simply as ideas that are transferred from mind to mind. You are awfully dismissive of fiction even though you like to write it yourself. I could argue about the dogmatic nature of many 'men of science' which I feel is opposed to the very spirit of what science is supposed to be about, but we have been down that road.

 

Anyway, it's fun to be a fairy, even if it is all pretend. If I just agreed with you that fairies weren't real, well that wouldn't be fun at all!

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We have been down that road. You think science is about "ANYTHING being possible and is real until we can prove otherwise!"

 

The science I know is about, "We know fuck all, so let's figure it out step by step, test by test until every angle shows the same result. Then, and only then, is something real."

Edited by That One NPC

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From the templates I've released over the years I tend to do at most three variations but when it comes to the end user building upon them it's always been the mid skin tone that's used. It could be personal preference, I dunno. 

 

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On 10/29/2019 at 4:21 PM, That One NPC said:

We have been down that road. You think science is about "ANYTHING being possible and is real until we can prove otherwise!"

 

The science I know is about, "We know fuck all, so let's figure it out step by step, test by test until every angle shows the same result. Then, and only then, is something real."

 

That's not an accurate description of what I think though. In fact I am almost saying the exact opposite: Not that anything is real, but that nothing is. At least by your definition. I don't believe it's really possible to really prove that 'every angle shows the same result' as you put it. But that's not really the point in the first place if you ask me. Science is best looked at not as an attempt to find reality, but an attempt to build the best approximation of reality possible.

 

A lot of what I say may or may not be something I strongly believe in. Not that I intend to deceive or troll, I just like to play with ideas. There is at least one thing I do strongly believe in though: That strongly believing in things can be incredibly dangerous. Yes including strongly believing that strongly believing in things can be incredibly dangerous. I mean, look how much I get in trouble with people over it? :3 Incredibly dangerous doesn't mean it's bad. Just dangerous. I won't say anyone is wrong to do so, just that it's risky.

 

 

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How do you guys feel about stereotypes? I think society unfairly criticizes all forms of media for having stereotypical characters in movies, TV shows, and video games. Some people in reality fit those types of descriptions and are the real life version of those stereotypes. Those people and customers relate to stereotypes in media.

 

However, not every person is a stereotype. For example, I'm black. I like rock, and dislike rap. I am professional/clean cut, and not urban. I do not say the N word, and I am offended by anyone including blacks who would call me by that word. I don't relate to stereotypes in media. Most black characters in video games fit a stereotype. I don't mind stereotypes in media, but I tend to turn away from media with every black character being a stereotype.

 

I really like Jimmy Olson from the Supergirl TV series. I can relate to him in nearly all aspects of the character. Some fans dislike the character for a variety of reasons, but I think the character was very good throughout the series.  

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@FranklinX Stereotypes are garbage. However, there are certain styles/cultures/etcetera that stereotypes are assigned to (wrongfully mind you), that I do enjoy perusing, regardless of the medium. I mean, anyone can potentially play guitar, but there's only one Hendrix/Satriani/Hudson (Slash)/Morello/Root/Li/Jett/(enter any other name of Guitar Hero here), and that's what I like about that is that one can learn from their playstyles, but emulating them leads to 'I can't believe my kid is turning into another f*cking James Hetfield!'... that's the garbage I hate seeing because ultimately it is not true, harmful to boot.

That was a specific example, sure, but it should get the point across all the same.

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Regarding stereotypes, I think the big question is this: What marks the difference between a 'stereotype' and an 'archetype'?

 

Broadly speaking most stories are kinda built on the back of archetypes, that is to say basic foundational character types that are used again and again throughout history as part of the collective culture of all people. There is really nothing wrong with using archetypes in this way. In fact, It might be impossible not to. No matter what character you think of it most likely can be traced back to a basic archetype. Even going out of your way to defy an archetype is still using the archetype to define the character by way of contrast. There can be simple purely archetypal characters that while sometimes a bit boring can be used to comment on and dissect archetypes, or there can be more complex characters often mix and match foundational archetypes to build something that if not unique is at least interesting. It goes beyond fiction too, but I will refrain from my usual philosophical/religious wanking this time. Lucky you! :3

 

Stereotypes aren't the same thing though. I guess maybe the best way to explain it is that you could say stereotypes are like what happens when you take an archetype and kinda suck all the life out of it till it's nothing but a ridged walking corpse and throw it out into the world with no context or subtlety. It's become a shambling zombie of an idea without purpose or understanding, only existing to spread it's self and uncaring about the damage it causes. Archetypes don't need to become stereotypes for them to be useful. Like say you want to have a 'greedy merchant' character. There are plenty of ways to express the archetype without making it into a harmful stereotype. You don't need to make them have a hook nose, or have them be fat, or whatever else. They can take many many other forms. You can mix other ideas in to make the character more interesting without sacrificing the core archetypal ideas. You don't need to crush all of the expressive spirit out of an archetype and render it in it's most base stereotypical form.

 

So basically: An archetype's lifeblood is it's ability to express things across different cultures and incarnations. Stereotypes are zombified husks created when an archetype is rigidly locked into a set from where their freedom of expression is taken away. So, experiment I say! Mix and match, create atypical forms, do something interesting with your archetypes! Don't just blindly rely on set patterns! Also, remember that even if stereotypes are bad, inside every stereotype is a poor abused archetype that needs some love too! Letting them be expressed in a new way can give them a new life!

 

Edited by Kayzee

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On 10/7/2019 at 3:42 AM, Kayzee said:

You know, I was actually thinking of making one of the fairy characters in my game have dark skin. Yes fairies can have dark skin.

 

I think making one dark and the rest light might unintentionally make her feel like a minority among fairies. You may have already been planning something like this based on how you continued on and mentioned blue or green skin, but I would recommend giving every major fairy character a unique skin tone to represent like a tribe or alignment or type of fairie. Making any "white" or caucasian fairy a minority in the group as well. That would create a sense of diversity and equality within their society and function.

 

It's so important to do this in games today, and to do it properly. I drafted a ton of characters for a Suikoden project and low and behold, my Euro-Canadian ass subconsciously created 80% whites. It's a psychological thing, and partly because some of the custom assets I have don't cooperate with the darker two skin tones.

 

I am going to do the entire cast over again at some point to correct this. I am tired of white representation dominating our video games.

 

 

Edited by That One NPC

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1 hour ago, That One NPC said:

 

I think making one dark and the rest light might unintentionally make her feel like a minority among fairies. You may have already been planning something this based on how you continued on and mention blue or green skin, but I would recommend giving every major fairy character a unique skin ton to represent like a tribe or alignment or type of fairie. Making any "white" or caucasian fairy a minority in the group as well. That would create a sense of diversity and equality within their society and function.

 

Yeah, that's one of the reasons I haven't done it, because I am not sure if it would make her stand out in a way that really wouldn't add anything. I kinda like the idea of every fairy having their own skin tone, but at the same time... Well, historically fairy culture is deeply entangled with human Celtic and Nordic cultures and a lot of fairies do have sorta have light skin. May or may not be the 'majority', but still a sizable chunk. However, here is the real point I want to make: For fairies, skin color is more or less completely unrelated to race. Regardless of what skin tone may be more popular, to call anyone with a different skin color a 'minority' would be like calling anyone with a different hair color a 'minority'. Especially in a culture where using hair dye is common. I mean, do you treat humans who dye their hair blue as their own racial group? That sounds kinda silly to me! Same with fairies and skin color. Sure, some social groups might prefer a different style of fashion, but it's not related to race.

 

It's not that fae beings don't have their own racial groups of sorts mind you, they are just not marked by skin color. I mean, I may have said it before, but a good way to annoy a fairy is to mistake them for a pixie and visa versa. I mean, fairies and pixies get along okay sometimes, but they have a history ya know? It doesn't help that humans mix them up all the time.

Edited by Kayzee

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(since pixies and fairies have the same evolutionary ancestors...easy mistake to make)

I agree that a lot of what one knows is what comes out creatively, as @That One NPC had postulated, but it doesn't exactly have to come out in a predictable way.

 

In my case, Ramsey has pale skin. On the surface, sounds drab. She even explains how she hates that her pale skin affords her certain 'passes', in the long explanation of how she hates society as a whole. Even pale skin can have powerful results when given a compelling reason.

Not every character will have pale skin. I am looking to avoid having that be a thing at all. One thing I am grateful for is that I know more or less how to alter HSL values to get natural skin tones, so it's easier to pull this off with GCH.

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To me skin color doesn't really matter in that way. It's not as if I have anything against white characters or value them any less, it's just that pop culture has warped most people's subconscious to the point when we create a character, we generally think of them as white, unless the concept was some form of niche like an Afro archytype, an asian assassin, samurai, etc. On role playing boards this has been discussed and analysed relentlessly, and it seems to be a case of subconscious comfort created by the content we've been exposed to our entire lives (and I think that's the entire agenda there).

 

When I create a lead male protag, he's almost always white. I mean, 99.9% of the time. I don't value ethnic individuals any less, I play many of them, but my main is almost always white. It's what we all know.

Edited by That One NPC

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6 hours ago, That One NPC said:

To me skin color doesn't really matter in that way. It's not as if I have anything against white characters or value them any less, it's just that pop culture has warped most people's subconscious to the point when we create a character, we generally think of them as white, unless the concept was some form of niche like an Afro archytype, an asian assassin, samurai, etc. On role playing boards this has been discussed and analysed relentlessly, and it seems to be a case of subconscious comfort created by the content we've been exposed to our entire lives (and I think that's the entire agenda there).

 

When I create a lead male protag, he's almost always white. I mean, 99.9% of the time. I don't value ethnic individuals any less, I play many of them, but my main is almost always white. It's what we all know.

 

This is pretty much true, but you gotta remember that 'niche' is often in the eye of the beholder. I mean, there is a lot of pop culture out there that seems mostly made by and/or targeted at particular demographics and as a result anyone outside that demographic often ends up finding it niche regardless of how overwhelmingly popular it might be with that demographic. And if the demographic is a minority group in the first place it's going to often be doubly niche to anyone outside that group. So I am willing to bet there are people out there who have been mostly exposed to things that cause them to generally think of characters as some other race by default. But you don't tend to see them because the stuff you are interested in tends to be 'niche' to them, so they don't hang out in the same places. Really 'pop culture' is more like a bunch of segregate sub-cultures then anything else. Every once and a while something will break out and become popular with a lot of different people true, but I think the only reason white people seem to be over represented is just because there kinda are more of them around making stuff.

Edited by Kayzee

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On 11/7/2019 at 7:58 AM, That One NPC said:

To me skin color doesn't really matter in that way. It's not as if I have anything against white characters or value them any less, it's just that pop culture has warped most people's subconscious to the point when we create a character, we generally think of them as white, unless the concept was some form of niche like an Afro archytype, an asian assassin, samurai, etc. On role playing boards this has been discussed and analysed relentlessly, and it seems to be a case of subconscious comfort created by the content we've been exposed to our entire lives (and I think that's the entire agenda there).

 

When I create a lead male protag, he's almost always white. I mean, 99.9% of the time. I don't value ethnic individuals any less, I play many of them, but my main is almost always white. It's what we all know.

 

I disagree with you on your point of we all know the main protagonist is almost always white. There is enough media with the main protagonist with a ethnic background of African American, Mexican, Japanese, etc. I think a person's exposure or lack of exposure is due to a person's culture and their personal interests.

 

Some people just do not want to watch other races in media.There is a guy from a different forum who said he would feel weird if he saw a African American in a RPG game from the RPG Maker. His comment screams volumes about his lack of exposure to media with different ethic and racial groups.

 

I am only speaking for myself. I have seen protagonists from many different backgrounds. My first favorite white protagonist was Tommy Oliver from Power Rangers. Then, we had TJ, a black guy as the Red Turbo Ranger and leader of the Turbo rangers.

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11 hours ago, FranklinX said:

 

I disagree with you on your point of we all know the main protagonist is almost always white. There is enough media with the main protagonist with a ethnic background of African American, Mexican, Japanese, etc. I think a person's exposure or lack of exposure is due to a person's culture and their personal interests.

 

Some people just do not want to watch other races in media.There is a guy from a different forum who said he would feel weird if he saw a African American in a RPG game from the RPG Maker. His comment screams volumes about his lack of exposure to media with different ethic and racial groups.

 

I am only speaking for myself. I have seen protagonists from many different backgrounds. My first favorite white protagonist was Tommy Oliver from Power Rangers. Then, we had TJ, a black guy as the Red Turbo Ranger and leader of the Turbo rangers.

 

I was kinda saying something similar in my own response. Like I said, there is a lot of media out there and a lot of it is created by and/or targeted to different cultural groups. However I don't really think he was entirely wrong. Consider this: How much media is there that actually has a broad cross-cultural appeal, and of that how much of that tends to primarily created by, marketed to, and staring white people? I am pretty sure that's mostly because there are (or were) more white people making and/or buying more stuff, but still! Come to think of it though, I think a lot of media today is way more diverse in it's casting then it was in the past few decades, so that's probobly a good trend... but on the other hand we now have hoards of angry people ranting about how SJWs ruined Star Wars and Ghostbusters and such (and maybe they even did, I donno movies aren't my thing) so... yeah.

 

Point is, I can see where he is coming from. I think it's more the case that people in any given group will tend to be drawn more to characters within that group, but I think a side effect of that is that media kinda becomes segregated into lots of little cultural niches that don't tend to overlap much, and when they do it's mostly the people with the most population/money/power/whatever who get the most exposure. But hey, China is trying to kinda take over Hollywood so maybe in a few decades white people will stop being in everything and be replaced by Chinese people. It could happen!

Edited by Kayzee

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3 hours ago, Kayzee said:

China is trying to kinda take over Hollywood so maybe in a few decades white people will stop being in everything and be replaced by Chinese people. It could happen!


Hueueueueue...
They target Silicon Valley. Energy supply. Private Sector. Those wildfires? PG&E, which is Chinese owned.

Anyway...

It's not that media is segregated due to preference, but rather, the lamestream media brainwashes us into that preference.
I watch non-lamestream videos on YouTube for a reason. I avoid TV pretty much altogether, short of a few shows I watch because I find them to have some sort of creative value, but that's it really. I'd rather watch old movies than the latest 'happening new show', lololololololol

Watching this 'guy' and this 'girl' makeout, date, and all that? Yawn. I'd rather count pixels.

Getting sidetracked here...

I'd rather see a game made with no stereotypes referenced, not even as a passing joke. I don't think I'll be able to do that myself, since I have way too many references planned to various things like Clock Tower's antagonist (who gets their ass kicked-spoiler), among many other references to games and media I enjoy/find funny or stupid, lol

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20 hours ago, FranklinX said:

 

I disagree with you on your point of we all know the main protagonist is almost always white. There is enough media with the main protagonist with a ethnic background of African American, Mexican, Japanese, etc. I think a person's exposure or lack of exposure is due to a person's culture and their personal interests.

 

Some people just do not want to watch other races in media.There is a guy from a different forum who said he would feel weird if he saw a African American in a RPG game from the RPG Maker. His comment screams volumes about his lack of exposure to media with different ethic and racial groups.

 

I am only speaking for myself. I have seen protagonists from many different backgrounds. My first favorite white protagonist was Tommy Oliver from Power Rangers. Then, we had TJ, a black guy as the Red Turbo Ranger and leader of the Turbo rangers.

 

 

Unfortunately, western (North American and UK) media is dominated by white characters as a statistical fact. And when new ethnic characters spring up in big brand stuff, it's usually a white character that's been race swapped, rather than an ethnic character created for the purpose of that representation. Only in the last 20 years has a change began to slowly take root. I recall watching the original power rangers. There was a black character, but it wasn't the leader. A white man named Jason was the leader. The black guy was, well, the Black Ranger... Big fuckin' shocker in the 90s. It was actually perfectly inconspicuous in the 90s. No one blinked twice about the black kid being the black ranger.

 

 

Your experience is indicative of your experience, and your experience alone. African American and African Canadian people would strongly disagree about there being an abundance of representation within mainstream media, which is mainstream for a reason. They pay the best actors, directors, editors, visual effects teams, etc. They create and acquire licenses to the best content. People don't want to rummage dark corners of the web and sift through B content to find themselves represented in media that can connect them to others and be a source of pride and fandom. It's super easy to have a few favorite black characters and downplay an issue, or prefer obscure indies and claim there's no harm no foil. But there is a very real issue in the actual numbers and data, and it's been changing the lives of people for a hundred years.

 

Imagine being Mexican, or Brazilian. Trying to find a wildly popular movie where someone who looks and speaks like you is the hero. Is the one who rises up, inspires, saves, overcomes and creates change? Instead of the gangster antagonist, the untrustworthy druglord, the unsavory cab driver, the simple farmer who hides with his family whilst John Cena or Keanu Reeves save the day...

 

Imagine. Perhaps you are ethnic and don't care. Lucky you. Everyone isn't like you.

Edited by That One NPC

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7 hours ago, PhoenixSoul said:

It's not that media is segregated due to preference, but rather, the lamestream media brainwashes us into that preference.
I watch non-lamestream videos on YouTube for a reason. I avoid TV pretty much altogether, short of a few shows I watch because I find them to have some sort of creative value, but that's it really. I'd rather watch old movies than the latest 'happening new show', lololololololol

 

It's both really. It's a feedback loop: People create and watch media based on their own preferences, which are influenced by the media they are exposed to. Don't think you are immune to this just because you don't watch TV much, this is true with all media, including Youtube. This is just how culture works in general. Cultural information spreads in forms that are mimicked and spread by people exposed to them, and cultures evolve naturally from the information that is passed from person to person.

 

I probobly already told you this, but for the sake of anyone who I haven't told this to: We have a name for these units of information ya know. You might have heard it before even. They are called 'memes'. :P The word meme was actually created as a sort of play on the words 'gene' and 'mimic' to describe how cultures sorta evolve through the coping of cultural information the same way genes do with genetic information.

 

It's worth thinking about what makes up your 'cultural DNA' so to speak and what differs about other people's. And it's good to remember that unlike your genes, you can always be exposed to different memes and have your cultural outlook changed. The good thing about that is, you aren't stuck with the same memes as soon as you are born. The bad thing about it is that memes have a nasty habit of sneaking up on people and worming into their head and can be very destructive. Hehe, even the idea of memes it's self is a meme, so be careful when taking it too seriously too. :3

Edited by Kayzee

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4 hours ago, That One NPC said:

 

 

Unfortunately, western (North American and UK) media is dominated by white characters as a statistical fact. And when new ethnic characters spring up in big brand stuff, it's usually a white character that's been race swapped, rather than an ethnic character created for the purpose of that representation. Only in the last 20 years has a change began to slowly take root. I recall watching the original power rangers. There was a black character, but it wasn't the leader. A white man named Jason was the leader. The black guy was, well, the Black Ranger... Big fuckin' shocker in the 90s. It was actually perfectly inconspicuous in the 90s. No one blinked twice about the black kid being the black ranger.

 

 

Your experience is indicative of your experience, and your experience alone. African American and African Canadian people would strongly disagree about there being an abundance of representation within mainstream media, which is mainstream for a reason. They pay the best actors, directors, editors, visual effects teams, etc. They create and acquire licenses to the best content. People don't want to rummage dark corners of the web and sift through B content to find themselves represented in media that can connect them to others and be a source of pride and fandom. It's super easy to have a few favorite black characters and downplay an issue, or prefer obscure indies and claim there's no harm no foil. But there is a very real issue in the actual numbers and data, and it's been changing the lives of people for a hundred years.

 

Imagine being Mexican, or Brazilian. Trying to find a wildly popular movie where someone who looks and speaks like you is the hero. Is the one who rises up, inspires, saves, overcomes and creates change? Instead of the gangster antagonist, the untrustworthy druglord, the unsavory cab driver, the simple farmer who hides with his family whilst John Cena or Keanu Reeves save the day...

 

Imagine. Perhaps you are ethnic and don't care. Lucky you. Everyone isn't like you.

 

 

There are ethic main protagonist. I gave the example of TJ the Red Turbo Ranger. The current Red Ranger is also black. Jon Stewart is a black Green Lantern, and many fans prefer him as the Green Lantern. Will Smith in I am Legend is a strong main protagonist. Let's not forget Will Smith in Independence Day. Rey Mysterio a professional wrestler is one of the most popular main protagonists in recent history of professional wrestling. 

 

Those are just a few examples of ethic main protagonists.

 

Now we must ask ourselves a simple question. Is it fair to demand an artist to include a racial group in his or her work? An artist should freely express his or her ideas. For example, If Rick thinks only white women are beautiful, then he should be free to only hire white models for his calendar shoots. You may not like it. However, he is expressing his opinion on what beauty is. Is it fair for someone to demand someone to say "black women are beautiful and sexually attractive"? Is it fair to demand an artist to say "Big women are beautiful" The answer is no. No one must believe those ideas. We are all unique and have different opinions. We should be free to express those ideals to world.

 

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Just a few are the key words here. You can't give three examples and then downplay an issue that subconsciously affects millions of minority children every day. That's why the Black Panther movie was SUCH a big deal. It gave black children, both male and female, a big budget, big hype blockbuster with mostly black characters, very little negativity or stereotypes, and strong, confident African heroes. Not just Black Americans, but an image of Africa beyond the negatives.

 

It's really a shame that people still think a handful of ethnic characters here and there should be enough to shut everyone up.

Edited by That One NPC

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3 hours ago, That One NPC said:

Just a few are the key words here. You can't give three examples and then downplay an issue that subconsciously affects millions of minority children every day. That's why the Black Panther movie was SUCH a big deal. It gave black children, both male and female, a big budget, big hype blockbuster with mostly black characters, very little negativity or stereotypes, and strong, confident African heroes. Not just Black Americans, but an image of Africa beyond the negatives.

 

It's really a shame that people still think a handful of ethnic characters here and there should be enough to shut everyone up.

 

I never downplayed the subconscious affects on minority children. I also never said people should shut up. 

 

Black Panther was a major success and great for everyone. It showed a positive side of Blacks. That's great and no one is downplaying it. My examples weren't to say there are enough black characters. My examples were to show there are some black or ethnic heroes in media. 

 

You can freely criticize an artist. However, an artist has the right to express his or her beliefs in their work.

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I say: There's a serious, documented problem with ethnic representation in mainstream media.

 

You say: No, I disagree. One of nine Red Rangers were black.

 

You didn't downplay the affect on minority children, you downplayed the issue that affects them.

 

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4 hours ago, That One NPC said:

I say: There's a serious, documented problem with ethnic representation in mainstream media.

 

You say: No, I disagree. One of nine Red Rangers were black.

 

You didn't downplay the affect on minority children, you downplayed the issue that affects them.

 

 

I disagreed on your statement about white heroes are all we know. Are most heroes white men? Yes, many heroes are white men. However, there are some black heroes. I am not saying there is a fair portion of black heroes. I am saying black heroes exist and we should acknowledge them in this discussion. It's not fair to say almost every hero is white when that is stretching the facts. The amount of ethic heroes have increased in most medias over the last twenty years. Video games are the only form of media that has not progressed.

 

On 11/7/2019 at 7:58 AM, That One NPC said:

To me skin color doesn't really matter in that way. It's not as if I have anything against white characters or value them any less, it's just that pop culture has warped most people's subconscious to the point when we create a character, we generally think of them as white, unless the concept was some form of niche like an Afro archytype, an asian assassin, samurai, etc. On role playing boards this has been discussed and analysed relentlessly, and it seems to be a case of subconscious comfort created by the content we've been exposed to our entire lives (and I think that's the entire agenda there).

 

When I create a lead male protag, he's almost always white. I mean, 99.9% of the time. I don't value ethnic individuals any less, I play many of them, but my main is almost always white. It's what we all know.

 

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