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Pukurin

Math teacher incomming (Fr/En)

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Hi ! 

 

My name is Loïc, I'm a 25 yo french guy. I live in the countryside near Melun. 

I'm a math teacher in a "collège" (pupils are from 11 to 15 yo) and I'm trying to make my lessons in a more playful way thanks to RPG MAKER. As I know Java and programming, I managed to add some options by rewriting some lines from plugins. Unfortunatly, I'm not able to do everythings I want and need some help so ... I'm here ! 

 

I also run a programming club at school. My pupils are using RPG Maker xp and are losts some times. 

 

Don't hesitate to contact me, especially if you're french ! 

 

Thx for reading !

 

PS : Pukurin is the japanese name of a pokemon, just in case ...

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4 minutes ago, Rikifive said:

Hello there!

 

Oh, making math less scary and more entertaining for students is a nice idea. 😁

 

Welcome!

 

Thank's ! ^^ 

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I am kinda curious... What do you plan on teaching with RPG Maker, and how do you plan on doing it? I absolutely believe RPG Maker can be used to teach, but I think you need to be careful not to make it a gimmick that overshadows the rest of the lesson.

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2 minutes ago, Kayzee said:

I am kinda curious... What do you plan on teaching with RPG Maker, and how do you plan on doing it? I absolutely believe RPG Maker can be used to teach, but I think you need to be careful not to make it a gimmick that overshadows the rest of the lesson.

 

Last year I've started to change some aspects of the class by inspiring the work of a quite famous maths teacher in France and Lee Sheldon's book "The Multiplayer Classroom". In France, students are commonly evaluated with grades. The idea is to make grades on 1,000 and adds them. If you have 500 out of 1,000 and then 700 on a second test, then you have 1,200 points. You level up and still have 200 points for the next level. I've also changed some terms (activities are quests, tests are dungeons, ...). I presented the mathematic programm on a map, where chapters are cities to visit. Finally, I've introduce a lot of popculture in the quests. So instead of a random pirate sharing his treasure, it's Luffy sharing the bounty of Crocodile.

 

But maths are still the main part of the lesson. With RPGMaker, I want to imporve student immersion. So they can see the character meeting Luffy and talking to him, instead of simply have a paper to read. They can also see their Xp on screen with their avatar.

 

Hope my approximate English won't make confusions or a lack of understanding ^^ 

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It seems pretty easy to understand to me! I heard about teachers trying that kind of thing before, though to be honest I have kind of mixed feelings about it. It feels sorta like doing the same thing schools have always done with a slightly different coat of paint and doesn't go much deeper then the superficial. It honestly kinda feels like a cheep trick... I don't know if every type of student will really engage with that the way you might want them too. Really if you ask me grinding for XP is pretty much the most boring part of most games anyway, so that shouldn't really be the kind of thing you are trying to emulate. :P

 

I kinda think games can actually do more then that! Games can teach people in a whole new way though the gameplay it's self! Games are mostly about problem solving and playing with sets of rules after all... So many games have you learning a ever expanding set of tools and using them to solve increasingly challenging problems. I think a good example is Baba is You actually. Or maybe even more to the point, Shenzhen I/O. Seriously Shenzhen I/O and other games like it are a pretty amazing introduction to the basics of computer programing while also being pretty fun games in their own right. I can't help but wonder if a fun game could be built that revolved around using math as a game mechanic, something that actually made playing with math it's self feel fun! I have seen some attempts at this before but I am not sure if any game has really quite nailed that sorta thing.

 

Oh well. The important thing is that you are a teacher who is willing to try things, and that's fantastic!

 

 

Edited by Kayzee

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4 hours ago, Kayzee said:

It seems pretty easy to understand to me! I heard about teachers trying that kind of thing before, though to be honest I have kind of mixed feelings about it. It feels sorta like doing the same thing schools have always done with a slightly different coat of paint and doesn't go much deeper then the superficial. It honestly kinda feels like a cheep trick... I don't know if every type of student will really engage with that the way you might want them too. Really if you ask me grinding for XP is pretty much the most boring part of most games anyway, so that shouldn't really be the kind of thing you are trying to emulate. :P

 

I kinda think games can actually do more then that! Games can teach people in a whole new way though the gameplay it's self! Games are mostly about problem solving and playing with sets of rules after all... So many games have you learning a ever expanding set of tools and using them to solve increasingly challenging problems. I think a good example is Baba is You actually. Or maybe even more to the point, Shenzhen I/O. Seriously Shenzhen I/O and other games like it are a pretty amazing introduction to the basics of computer programing while also being pretty fun games in their own right. I can't help but wonder if a fun game could be built that revolved around using math as a game mechanic, something that actually made playing with math it's self feel fun! I have seen some attempts at this before but I am not sure if any game has really quite nailed that sorta thing.

 

Oh well. The important thing is that you are a teacher who is willing to try things, and that's fantastic!

 

 

 

The main problem of using video games for teaching is the lack of computers at school (30 for 700 students). I had a wonderfull online game (Navadra) that was really usefull to exercise on simple tasks but the developpers were ruined and they closed the website. We can use it at school but the main interest was to use it at home ... 

I know some teachers who use real video games to teach, but not maths. Furthermore, all children don't like video games, and my class allow them to find other ways to learn. But I still use a lot of games in my lessons, like Battleship for point locating, and some of my colleagues made escape games ! 

 

 

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I am glad your class allows people to find other ways to learn! No matter what you do not everyone will be good at learning the same way, and that's always a problem with any school program. Still, no reason not to do your best! I am rooting for you!

 

Hmmm... Now that I think about it, I think the best thing that games could offer education is that a games are both a lesson and a test. Most of the time in classrooms it seems people are doing either one or the other but not both, either sitting there trying to pay attention to what is taught, or stressing out while they try to recall the exact bit of information they need to pass. With a game people do both at once in cycles... Uncovering more and more knowledge as they fiddle with things which in turns lets therm figure out how to get to the next stage. That makes it much more satisfying and engaging then staying up all night studying everything and then trying to recall everything while being under stress from being forced to preform. Just food for thought.

Edited by Kayzee

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Hello! Welcome to the forums! I have seen a few educational games made with the RPG Maker. I recommend making a fun game that rewards students/players for getting correct answers. Also, research educational games by RPG Maker and you will find some.

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