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Releasing games without needing RTP, lightweight and easy

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It's every developer's biggest wish to make a game reach as big as audience as possible. To reach beyond the community of VX Ace, you have to be able to make the game function without the RTP. But do you really need every single item from the RTP included? Not only do you add tons of recources not needed for the game, you are basically beefing up the file size way past its requirements.

 

It's my pleasure to teach you how to make your game both light weight, as well as working without RTP, easily and 100% idiot proof.

 

Step 1: How does my game know it needs RTP?

 

If you release a game without RTP, your player will be greeted with an error saying "This game requires ACE RTP" or something along the lines. This is not good as they'll be unable to play the game. However, there is a very easy way to get past this.

 

First of all, go to your game folder and locate "Game.ini" file. You should be greeted with a file that's something along the lines of this.

 

tutorial1.jpg

 

Now looking at the Game.ini file you may have seen RTP file. Logically thinking, you can guess that by removing the RTP line you'd make the game work without RTP and you'd be right. There is just one problem. Everytime you do changes to the project and save it, the game adds the RTP=RPGVXACE at it. This is very aggrivating, especially if you forget to import something and have to come back to import it later, thus forcing you to go and delete the RTP line again. So how do you fix this?

 

tutorial2.jpg

 

As you can see, the RTP= is left intact however, the RPGCXACE part has been removed. This tricks the game to never finding the rtp, even when it's on your computer but never needing it. Save this change you've just made and you can close the Game.ini file.

 

Step 2: Making your game work

 

By now, if you've tried starting your game after this point, you'll probably start getting missing file errors. This is because your game no longer finds the games in RTP folder but rather in the game folder. What you want to do is import stuff from the RTP that you need for your game, the ones that give errors. Use resource manager and you can drag many items at once, importing them to your project. Make sure you test the game various times so that you've got all the game's bugs worked out. If you have the missing file error, your player also will have it.

 

tip5.png

 

Step 3: Releasing your game

 

After you no longer get missing file errors and are done with your game or want to release a beta or something for the public to admire, there's one last step for you to follow.

 

tutorial3.jpg

 

Making sure that the Include RTP Data is on, is esential. Now, you can just compress the game wherever you want, along with encrypting it if you need to.

 

 

Congratulations, now your game works with anyone being able to play it and it is not nearly as massive in size!

Edited by MISTER BIG T

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This seems... unnecessary.

 

No offense, it's just that uploading takes a long time when you include RTP Data. It's easier if people just make sure they already have the RTP on their computers before they try to play Ace games.

 

I don't see myself using this, but it may be useful to others. Nice tutorial though.

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No offense, it's just that uploading takes a long time when you include RTP Data.

 

If you don't use every single item from the RTP ever made, it won't.

 

It's easier if people just make sure they already have the RTP on their computers before they try to play Ace games.

 

It's not really fair to ask your downloaders to download more files than really needed for the game to work when this is a simple fix. Since you include only the files you need, it's actually a lot less in size than having all the RTP files, even those not needed by the game to run.

 

 

If it takes overly long time (4+ hours), I would suggest buying a faster internet. Uploading about 150-200 meg games does not take that long from me and I don't even have fastest connections there is. Alternatively, leave the uploading running and go watch movie or something. Even on a slow internet, uploading a 300 megs shouldn't take more than about 3½ hours which you can easily just leave FTP upload running, maybe even while going to bed and leaving it uploading if it's even slower than that.

 

I don't see myself using this, but it may be useful to others. Nice tutorial though.

 

Thank you, I am sure it's not useful for people who use every single file from RTP but people like me who use only few SFX or animations or such will want to look into this to make their games more light weight and reducing the ammount of extra hassle from the player.

Edited by MISTER BIG T

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It's not really fair to ask your downloaders to download more files than really needed for the game to work when this is a simple fix. Since you include only the files you need, it's actually a lot less in size than having all the RTP files, even those not needed by the game to run.

 

It really depends on if how many games they wish to have on their computer at any given time. If the player only wishes to have one game at a time, play it, then delete it and grab the next, sure, including the RTP for every game would be the simpler way to go. But if the player plans on storing several games at once, or chooses to keep them after playing them, it's best for them to download the RTP themselves since they would only need to do it once (and the RTP is free), as it would save them space on their computer than having to include the RTP each and every time.

 

Personally, being that the RTP is free and will probably save on space over the long run, I personally opt for them to download the RTP themselves, but everybody is different.

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Yeah, like I said, not as useful to everyone but still, I figured if someone would have a need for it, then it'd be a nice to have detailed instructions how to do it simply without having to go around deleting the RTP= line everytime or something else.

 

For RPG Maker Ace community release, it probably doesn't matter. But if you plan on releasing the game to something that's never even heard of Ace, then you want to take aproach like this. There is a market outside of the RPGmaking community and to be able to reach something of such, it's always nice to have as little extra requirements as possible. :)

Edited by MISTER BIG T

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Yep, we always remove the RTP and include only the files necessary to run the game. The majority of our audience are not people who have the makers, and portals do NOT like telling their gamers that they have to download this or that package in order to play particular games.

 

If your target audience consists mainly of people who visit these forums, stuff like this is not necessary. But this information will be invaluable to those trying to reach a larger audience.

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In XP (maybe also in VX) someone wrote an small application (in C++) to go through your data files to search for resource dependencies and automatically import them into your project.

 

It wasn't perfect I believe, but if someone has written something like that it would be pretty useful.

 

It doesn't need to be written externally either.

Someone could write a quick script in Ace that will use the built-in parsers to quickly grab all of the data in a nice, usable form and then simply look for all of the resource names, compile a unique list, and then copy them over from the RTP folder.

 

Icons are fairly easy to deal with since you just need to import all your icons (no point in trying to crop it up, forcing you to re-index everything)

Edited by Tsukihime

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In XP (maybe also in VX) someone wrote an small application (in C++) to go through your data files to search for resource dependencies and automatically import them into your project.

 

It wasn't perfect I believe, but if someone has written something like that it would be pretty useful.

 

It doesn't need to be written externally either.

Someone could write a quick script in Ace that will use the built-in parsers to quickly grab all of the data in a nice, usable form and then simply look for all of the resource names, compile a unique list, and then copy them over from the RTP folder.

 

Icons are fairly easy to deal with since you just need to import all your icons (no point in trying to crop it up, forcing you to re-index everything)

 

 

VX, Jet did something similiar. I never got it to work without it crashing or freezing on me.

 

 

The fact is, since the game thinks you don't have the rtp, you'll be importing the files you're using, otherwis you'll get an error and it makes the game crash. Unless you don't play your own game, you'll pretty much be guaranteed to locate all the RTP files you've used.

 

 

I never thought there would be a workaround, but here it is. This info will be very useful to me and others.

 

I am glad you like it!

Edited by MISTER BIG T

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I have to say, I never even thought of this. It is a great work around. As stated above me, I myself also don't like telling my audience, oh btw download this also to make everything work. I really never even thought to look in the ini file. Good tut.

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There is no need for a user to have RTP installed on their system.

RPG Maker XV Ace automatically include all the RTP data when you checked "Include RTP data" so your tutorial may be helpful, but most of the RPG Maker XV Ace community would not apply it to their own use.

Thank you for your tutorial. Your tutorial is beneficial for other games in the other market of RPGmaking.

Edited by vom53

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It would be good not to assume, that because YOU don't have a need for this type of information, that everyone else here is the same (not speaking to anyone in particular).

 

If you're only using a few RTP resources, including RTP data would make your file much bigger than it needs to be. Portals will not allow you to tell players to download the RTP and install it separately. So SOME developers need a way to keep the file/download size small but still include everything the game needs.

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There seems to be a step missing here. It's easy enough to disable the RTP, but where do you find its parts so you can reimport them? Maybe I am missing something, but I can't find them.

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You have to figure out EVERYTHING that's in the RTP that your game requires, then use the resource manager and export them. This will put them into folders that you game can access. So when you remove the RTP you'll still have those resources, and they'll be packaged up when you compress the game.

 

The difference is that you're telling it specifically what parts of the RTP you want to use, and making those parts available outside of the RTP. So instead of bundling up the WHOLE RTP with your game, it only bundles what you actually use.

 

There's probably going to be a lot of checking required, as you won't know if you've missed something until you (or someone else) attempts to play it, reaches a part where it needs something it can't find, and crashes (probably with a message).

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Would it help if I released a script that goes through your data files and checks for any resource references?

It would be done in ruby because I don't have any way of loading an rvdata2 file properly in C#.

 

The issue is how I'm supposed to determine whether something is actually used or not.

 

For example, a skill has an animation. What if you don't use the skill? You don't need the animation then. But you might have a script that allows you to learn the skill dynamically even if it's not set through the database beforehand.

 

So I might just assume everything in the database is stuff you use. But that is no different from copying the entire RTP over because the default project starts with the entire RTP.

 

If I made a project, I wouldn't bother clearing out the database. Maybe other developers do, I don't know. All I know is that with my design, it would not help me one bit.

 

It isn't obvious how to determine whether something is actually RTP or custom.

Any idea how that would work? And what happens if someone decided to include their own custom files IN the RTP folders?

 

I will not be providing support for custom scripts that reference RTP materials.

Authors will have to alias and add their extra things themselves.

Edited by Tsukihime

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Here: http://www.rpgmakervxace.net/topic/5803-resource-list-simple-resource-checker/

 

Not thoroughly tested though, so backup your projects.

I mean, it's just about as reliable as doing it manually, except you don't have to waste time copying and pasting lol

 

Without doing any sophisticated dependency checks this is just about as simple as it gets without copying everything over. Sounds files are probably the biggest things that you're saving though, since those are simple enough to check.

Edited by Tsukihime

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There seems to be a step missing here. It's easy enough to disable the RTP, but where do you find its parts so you can reimport them? Maybe I am missing something, but I can't find them.

 

You can usually find RTP under where the main program is located at. under the RGSS3 folder.

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Thank you so much!!! The only problem I had with RPG maker was the need for users to download the RTP file. The audience I'm targetting is Japanese and they are getting used to using Wolf rpg editor, which does not require an additional rtp download.

 

mine would have seemed cumbersome and easily looked over. But I'm far more used to using rpg maker than wolf (not to mention that wolf is in japanese). 

 

once again, many thanks to you!!

((to illustrate the extent of my gratitude, I created an account for this community just to tell you that))

Edited by pepo

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